The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum

Go Back   The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum > BOATING FORUMS > The Boating Forum
Search

Notices

Random Quote: Some Hatteras owners don't like Grey Poupon.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 01-12-2007, 05:04 PM
  #21    
Senior MemberPLEDGERCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Delray Beach/Davie
Posts: 2,195
Default Re: Fantasy Island: which trawler to live aboard?

Nordhavn
__________________
endoman
endoman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2007, 06:20 PM
  #22    
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 355
Default Re: Fantasy Island: which trawler to live aboard?

AdamT: I have also had such dreams, but due to health issues with my wife, they remain dreams. In my research for liveability, seaworthiness, and just plain good looks, I have come up with the following: 1. Near coast: Pilgrim 40. The nicest liveaboard for a couple I have seen, with salty good looks, efficient single engine with bow thruster, lots of room for entertaining. Older boat probably will need refurbishing. Probably around 150K in good condition. 2. Offshore, with good near-island capablities: 42 Kadey-Krogen. single engine, very efficient and excellent layout for a couple plus occasional guests. Washer-dryer on board, pilot house, great bridge deck, plus cockpit with huge dropdown boarding platform. 3. Go anywhere: Willard 40. I'm partial to sedan type trawlers. This one has an innovative galley area and very nice owners stateroom forward, plus room for occasional guests. This boat is the epitome of the off shore cruiser, IMHO, and deserves consideration by any one considering your type of lifestyle/cruising adventure. There are many other very worthy vessels to consider, including the Defevers. Hatteras LRCs, and Grand Banks. Grand banks, and many of the far east built boats have problems with fuel tanks, IMOH. Buying an older boat of the order cited above, and refurbishing would get you a good basic hull and propulsion system with the satisfaction of seeing it finished to your particular needs. Just my opinion.
__________________
____________________
98 Shamrock 246WA 310HP SeaMax
79 Shamrock 200C Indmar 302 Ford
GOKAT is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 01-12-2007, 06:28 PM
  #23    
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Miami, FL
Posts: 8,597
Default Re: Fantasy Island: which trawler to live aboard?

Very sorry to hear that your wife isn't up to it, but thanks nonethelss for the great info., GOKAT. I'm not familiar with the Pilgrim or Willard boats, but I will certainly look into them. Not sure if 40' is going to be big enough. A lot depends on the layout. My wife and I are very close, but there are times when you don't want to be *that* close.

I love the look and seaworthiness of the Nordhavens, but $$$$$.
AdamT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2007, 06:40 PM
  #24    
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: ny
Posts: 4,060
Default RE: Fantasy Island: which trawler to live aboard?

my next door neighbor is planning the same thing in coupla years...he currently owns a 36 Mainship....but is in the market for used trawler type in the 40 something range to cruise from ny-florida and back several times a year. will keep u posted on what he is looking at (he's a very knowlegeable boater for 35 years. and also a diesel mechanic. (does all his own work)....
kloweree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2007, 06:44 PM
  #25    
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Miami, FL
Posts: 8,597
Default Re: Fantasy Island: which trawler to live aboard?

Quote:
steveyacht - 1/12/2007 2:07 PM

There are a great many fantastic trawlers out there that are well within your budget. Much will depend on the exact style that you prefer..... Euro Sedan, Sundeck, Classic, Flybridge (or not), Pilot house, etc. Some of the answers will come from the required number of staterooms you require. You already mentioned one of my all time Favorites, the Selene. The 53 Selene is a great boat whether powered with a single or two smaller HP diesels.

If you would like someting a bit more esoteric, there is always the Lord Nelson 49' Victory Tug, of which only 6 (some say 8) were built. Huge, heavily built, full displacement, balasted Keel and incredible interior joinery and teak work.

Certain Jefferson Pilot Hose models in the 53 to 57 foot range will work, even though they are technically a motoryacht, may were fitted with relatively smaller HP Cummins that make them pretty well suited as an economical cruiser, IF you don't push them too hard.

Then there is the venerable 55 Fleming, a true classic in the classic Euro sedan design and a vessel that is nearly legendary in the way they hold their value, even appreciating over the years. Beautiful boats.

Cape Horn, Marlow, Cheoy Lee, DeFever, Krogan, Eagle, American Tug, Nordic, Tiger, Cherubini, Hatteras LRC's, Hans Christian, Nordhavn, Willard, Sabreline etc are all great boats. Notice I left out one of the more popular named boats, the Grand Banks and EastBay. I feel that these have way too much exterior bright work and are over rated and over priced. There are many other trawlers and capable motor yachts out there that will do a better job for less money.

too many to choose from and way too little time to try them all. get yourself a subscription to PassageMaker Magazine. Best one for what you want.
Thanks a lot Steve. Actually it was your post in the golden circuit thread put me on to the Selenes. Sweet looking boats. Adding your list to my clip collection. Maybe I'll give you a call in a few years if/when it looks like this might happen.

I have subscribed to Passagemaker, which is definitely a great resource. In fact, in this months issue they have an article about converting work boats to cruisers. I'll have to say that it sounded like a great hobby, but a little too down and dirty for me.

They also had an article about that steel/aluminum hulled Neville, which looks salty as he11. No price mentioned, though, and I suspect it's going to be close to seven figures.
AdamT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2007, 06:50 PM
  #26    
jys
MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Jacksonville, Florida
Posts: 81
Default RE: Fantasy Island: which trawler to live aboard?

Adam,

You may want to look at the newly designed 43 Mainship. Fast trawler (around 17 knot cruise)with a lot of room and stability. Mainship should be at the Miami show
jys is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2007, 07:00 PM
  #27    
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Miami, FL
Posts: 8,597
Default Re: Fantasy Island: which trawler to live aboard?

Quote:
bsmit24 - 1/12/2007 12:51 PM

AdamT, have you considered a trawler cat? It would give you greater cruise speeds though I am not sure about 25knts. You may find this article interesting - http://www.powermultihulls.com/magaz...or%20plane.htm
Thanks, that's a very interesting read. Might help explain the unusual performance characteristics of my current GB cat. I think it was Yankeeboater who was saying it's theoretically impossible that it could be a displacement hull. The article suggests that the theory may not apply to certain cat hulls.
AdamT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2007, 08:39 PM
  #28    
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: So. Fla.
Posts: 328
Default Re: Fantasy Island: which trawler to live aboard?

Quote:
Dsaltydog - 1/12/2007 11:20 AM

Nordic was like a 11 kt cruise, no running from anything, but no need to either at her displacement.
Salty and I were down in Key Largo a couple of weeks ago and we saw this absolutely georgeous sweet trawler that just about anyone would have chosen over one of the more modern style motor yachts. I don't recall seeing who built it but possibly he will remember.
__________________
Hound

'00 Jupiter 31 CC; twin 300 Yam HPDI
'05 SeaPro 220CC; 200 Yam HPDI (SOLD)
Hound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2007, 01:27 AM
  #29    
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: in the Pacific
Posts: 418
Default Re: Fantasy Island: which trawler to live aboard?

While you in the "thinking" stage, go to Trawler Fest in Solomons, MD this Fall. www.trawlerfest.com I've been at the helm of most of the popular makes, but you need to touch them yourselves. So, spend a thousand bucks for the 3-day pass, accommodations, etc. Then you can have first hand look and feel for what you are about to get yourself into.

Full displacement hulls like the Krogen, Willard & Nordhavn will be more sea-kindly to first timers or those who don't care when the arrive, as long as it's in the same year. They are initially more expensive to purchase brand-new, but cost less to operate on single engines. Flopper-stoppers aren't necessary on these kind of vessels.

Shrimpers, if you can get past the stench from the holds, are a great bargain. You don't need to spend $250k for one, but it might take that much to get them into the conversion state. Most will be steel or wood and you can sell off the rigging for scrap prices. Wood isn't bad, as long as you are in cold water, otherwise a worm shoe is needed.

Good luck!
__________________
Capt. George Woodward
Died 16 DEC 2007
send ecards to family c/o bquasuittuq@yahoo.ca
59022 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2007, 07:09 AM
  #30    
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Dartmouth MA
Posts: 4,352
Default RE: Fantasy Island: which trawler to live aboard?




Since we're on Fantasy Island - I'll fantasize about these two. Maybe I could swing the Nordhavn, the Fleming will always be out of reach I fear...
__________________

1967 BW Nauset w/ 88SPL Johnson
1995 Fortier 26 w/Volvo KAMD42
mymojo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2007, 07:12 AM
  #31    
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Dartmouth MA
Posts: 4,352
Default RE: Fantasy Island: which trawler to live aboard?




Since we're on Fantasy Island - I'll fantasize about these two. Maybe I could swing the Nordhavn, the Fleming will always be out of reach I fear...
__________________

1967 BW Nauset w/ 88SPL Johnson
1995 Fortier 26 w/Volvo KAMD42
mymojo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2007, 07:52 AM
  #32    
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: St. Augustine, Fl
Posts: 15,413
Default Re: Fantasy Island: which trawler to live aboard?

Nordic Tug's are nice. I also like Grand Banks. You taking a break from the Bilge? Be sure and find a trawler that tracks hard right as you will always be steering it hard left. Good Luck
__________________
Since 1988. Proudly serving my community and state.



Everything happens for a reason. Sometimes that reason is because you're stupid and you make bad decisions.
Cracker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2007, 07:59 AM
  #33    
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Dartmouth MA
Posts: 4,352
Default Re: Fantasy Island: which trawler to live aboard?




Sorry for the 2x post above - #$%^$ server lag time!!!

Anyway here's a nice Nordic Tug 42 along with a newish DeFever 48. I think the NT 42 is good for a 16 knot cruise, the DeFever 8 or so.
__________________

1967 BW Nauset w/ 88SPL Johnson
1995 Fortier 26 w/Volvo KAMD42
mymojo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2007, 11:37 AM
  #34    
Junior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Jamestown, RI
Posts: 13
Default Re: Fantasy Island: which trawler to live aboard?

Adam,
I reiterate what someone said earlier about considering power catamarans. They are definitely more stable than monohulls, especially at anchor, almost always more fuel efficient, usually have shallower draft and protected props, and convenient, quick dinghy launching systems.

My favorite is the new PDQ 41 -- very well built, but a little pricey. For less money the Endeavour 44 is a god boat, and the Manta 44 is nice too.

If you go monohull, I hope you will lean toward a twin-screw boat. I'd be very worried about taking a single engine boat through the Caribbean -- some of the islands are pretty remote with no way to get service cheaply or quickly. Same in some of the out islands of the Bahamas.

If you have the bucks, consider the Grand Banks Aleutian series -- great boats. The Selenes are good boats too. The round hull Kadey-Krogens are single-screw and have soft chine hulls that roll and roll and roll in certain sea conditions.
If you want to consider used boats, there are a number of Tollycraft 44's and 45's on the market that have good solid hulls and are well-designed.

Good luck -- my wife and I are thinking seriously about buying a power cat or trawler type next year and doing the ICW/Bahamas and/or Great Loop.
jschieff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2007, 02:58 PM
  #35    
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 642
Default RE: Fantasy Island: which trawler to live aboard?

I've always liked these...... .mirage-mfg.com don't know why I can't post pictures here??


castnet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2007, 03:10 PM
  #36    
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 6,195
Default Re: Fantasy Island: which trawler to live aboard?

Quote:
AdamT - 1/12/2007 6:28 PM

Very sorry to hear that your wife isn't up to it, but thanks nonethelss for the great info., GOKAT. I'm not familiar with the Pilgrim or Willard boats, but I will certainly look into them. Not sure if 40' is going to be big enough. A lot depends on the layout. My wife and I are very close, but there are times when you don't want to be *that* close.

I love the look and seaworthiness of the Nordhavens, but $$$$$.
A used Nordhavn 40' fits your price range and criteria.
__________________
Move along, nothing to see here.
RI Builder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2007, 04:02 PM
  #37    
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Little River, SC
Posts: 1,972
Default Re: Fantasy Island: which trawler to live aboard?

I saw someone mention the new Mainship 43 Trawler. It is a trawler in name only, with a semi-displacement hull that is not the least bit effiecient nor sea-worthy as compared to its conteperarys. Same with many of the Grand Banks series, as they will run on a semi-displacement hull also. For a true long range passagemaker that will have enough room to act as comfortable live-aboard, you will need something larger than the 40 Nordhavn mentioned above. While I have every respect for the Norhavns, the 40 does not have the interior volume to be a long term, practical live-aboard. I am a fan of a Selene 53 with twin John Deere Marine Diesels. Portaguese Bridge, full displacement, ,veryhigh quality vessel that has true Trans Atantic capability. With any full displacement trawler, make sure she is equipped with a set of Hydraulic Stabalizers by Naiad or Wesmar. If contemplating long passages or long time in the Islands you will want a fuel polishing system, Water maker capable of making twice your water tankage per day, water filtration system, redundant communications, redundant electronics and navigation aides not to mention a host of other things.

When buying a trawler, look towards reselling it eventually. For this reason stay away from trendy designs such as trawler cats. Trawler folks mostly come from the sailboating ranks and are a very conservative lot, leaning to more traditional and conventionally styled boats of good strong build and superlative reputations. Most good quality usted trawlers have actually been appreciating in value over the past half decade or more, with the exception of many of the Trawler Cats. They tend to lanquish on the market by comparison.

When it finally comes time for you to actually buy one, find a broker that will represent you as your buyers' agent. One that knows the trawler and passagemaker market and knows what the hell he/she is talking about. Well worth it, considering it won't cost you a dime.
steveyacht is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2007, 06:14 PM
  #38    
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location:
Posts: 5,214
Default Re: Fantasy Island: which trawler to live aboard?

Adam,
You're talking about my dream. Coastal cruising and the islands. My question about this is the draft of your likely vessel. Would it allow you to operate in the waters you're considering?




Quote:
T Juan - 1/12/2007 4:00 PM

Due to thel cost of fuel, the lack of insurance, hurricanes and mainly imported shrimp, large 80'+ steel hull Gulf of Mexico shrimp trawlers are being sold for a song. Some have been rode hard and put up wet, but many are well cared for and were built by reputable builders. Many of the large boats are twin screw the smaller boats tend to be single screw. Purchase a decent one for $200,000.00, spend another $250,000.00 to $300,000.00 to convert it, sell your house and for about 1/2 Mil you can cruise the world. A "Yacht" of the same capacities would run you in the Multi-Millions.

I've been thinking the same recently. I see a lot of ads in Boats and Harbors for different size shrimpers. I love the traditional look. 50'-60' is the range I was looking at.

My problem is time and money. The boat would have to be stripped down completely to get the odor out (I would only buy steel or fiberglass) and then rebuilt. I've got the skills to do the work, but not the time and I don't have enough money to pay some one else to do it. Hopefully, when I retire, these type of deals will still be around.

Also the question of draft is a concern to me as many of these boats draw 4.5-6'.
OReely is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2007, 08:29 PM
  #39    
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Canada/Panama
Posts: 1,057
Default Re: Fantasy Island: which trawler to live aboard?

Most shrimpers are 60-100ft and draw 6-9ft.and are made of wood or steel. Fiberglass is ok for day shrimpers with no holds. A huge listing can be found www.oceanmarine.com
reefhunter2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2007, 11:15 AM
  #40    
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Little River, SC
Posts: 1,972
Default Re: Fantasy Island: which trawler to live aboard?

Quote:
OReely - 8/27/2007 7:14 PM

Adam,
You're talking about my dream. Coastal cruising and the islands. My question about this is the draft of your likely vessel. Would it allow you to operate in the waters you're considering?




Quote:
T Juan - 1/12/2007 4:00 PM

Due to thel cost of fuel, the lack of insurance, hurricanes and mainly imported shrimp, large 80'+ steel hull Gulf of Mexico shrimp trawlers are being sold for a song. Some have been rode hard and put up wet, but many are well cared for and were built by reputable builders. Many of the large boats are twin screw the smaller boats tend to be single screw. Purchase a decent one for $200,000.00, spend another $250,000.00 to $300,000.00 to convert it, sell your house and for about 1/2 Mil you can cruise the world. A "Yacht" of the same capacities would run you in the Multi-Millions.

I've been thinking the same recently. I see a lot of ads in Boats and Harbors for different size shrimpers. I love the traditional look. 50'-60' is the range I was looking at.

My problem is time and money. The boat would have to be stripped down completely to get the odor out (I would only buy steel or fiberglass) and then rebuilt. I've got the skills to do the work, but not the time and I don't have enough money to pay some one else to do it. Hopefully, when I retire, these type of deals will still be around.

Also the question of draft is a concern to me as many of these boats draw 4.5-6'.
Before you consider any commercial vessel as a prospective conversion project you had better be VERY prepared!!! I have seen more started and uncompleted projects of boats this type than I have ever seen finished products. There normally is YEARS of time invested, along with untolled hours of labor. Then it comes to the costs involved. Let's say yhou buy one for $50,000 (just a number I picked out of the air) How much, not including labor, will this project cost? By the time these guys get rid on one of these boats, believe me it is used UP! Needs to be toally gutted, power removed or at the very least a complete and total teardown and rebuild. Generators, AC/Heating systems, Plumbing, wiring, insulation, Galley, Staterooms and a re-fit of all electonics and getting rid off all the unwanted deck gear that was used for fishing. Most likely will need new fuel and water tanks................. I am telling you, buy a boat made for cruising you will have it sooner, far less headaches, not spend alot of difference!
steveyacht is offline   Reply With Quote
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Good live-aboard SeaNile Boater Dockside Chat 0 08-15-2008 09:58 AM
Looking for a Live-aboard MITCH DEMPSEY The Boating Forum 1 06-26-2008 07:49 AM
Live aboard experiences alberto101 The Boating Forum 16 01-26-2008 07:56 PM
Live Aboard on the Cape??? mr buck Northeast 9 08-08-2007 03:57 PM
sailboat live aboard Glen E The Boating Forum 0 01-11-2005 08:40 AM

 



©2009 TheHullTruth.com

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.2.0