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Old 11-24-2006, 07:59 PM
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Default Re: Help picking 1st BIG boat

Quote:
JJC - 11/24/2006 5:22 PM

I think you can find all of the info on bridge clearances at - http://www.greatloop.com/ The couple who started that web site also wrote a book 'Honey .
Yep, bought the book, joined the assoc, bought two charts already....
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Old 11-24-2006, 11:28 PM
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Default Re: Help picking 1st BIG boat

Agree the Nordhavn is not the boat for the Loop. I like the Defever 49, the hatteras 48 LRC, both of which are in your price range and hold their value well. The only time you will be in "open water" is part of the Great Lakes and the "Big Bend" area of Florida. There are some who like to be able to make a turn of speed to avoid an "overnighter", but since this is very limited, I don't think I would take that into consideration. The gas boats and house boats are not for this type of voyage. Gas is too expensive and doesn't have the range. House boats do make the trip, but have some other disadvantages, such as deckhouse windage and low freeboard. There are some places on the ICW where 4 foot draft is getting close, but you can watch the tides and make it by.

I also like the motor yacht type of boat, with lower powered diesels. A good saloon where you can see out, and an enclosed helm station are desirable. Also consider what dinghy and how it is carried. Staying at marinas can run the bill up--about half of the loop is still a dollar a foot a night--but prices seem to be going up--and some areas are up to $3 a foot a night. We prefer anchoring out for many reasons.

The Grand Banks tend to hold their values--but there is a fair amount of teak to maintain. The GB tends to be a bit wetter in a chop than hulls with more flare foreward. The MT quality is variable, but be very cautious about teak decks and cabin side delamination.

I assume that you are on the Great Loop list and have read those various posts by the Great Loop Association.
Consider buying all of "Skipper Bob's" books. Also Claiborne young's guides. When you get to navigation gear etc--there are issue to consider in older boats vs newer technology--and more accurate and up to date charts especially ENC of the inland water ways.

When you get to Pensacola give me a shout. I am listed on the "Circle of Friends" (google for information on this site).

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Old 11-25-2006, 08:20 AM
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Default Re: Help picking 1st BIG boat

Hatteras built a line of trawlers 42-48' in the late 70's-early 80's it looks like. Had 4-53 DD's... Looks like a candidate also.. I like the boat, not crazy about the age, with these boats there are so many systems I've never dealt with before it makes me a little nervous!

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi...oat_id=1561303
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Old 11-25-2006, 10:48 AM
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Default RE: Help picking 1st BIG boat

I found this info on the what kind of boat you will need for the trip enjoy.

''Checklist of boat features for the Great Loop

Your boat will be your home for an extended period of time (8 to 12 months or more). Make sure you will be comfortable with your living conditions. If not, you and your crew will surely not get as much enjoyment as you should out of the boating experience of a lifetime

By John and Judy Gill

First, let's define what a "Looper Boat" is. A Looper Boat is one which the owners plan to use to circumnavigate the eastern half of the United States and Canada. The voyage is between 5,500 to 7,000 miles plus or minus, depending on the route selected and is usually called the America's Great Loop Cruise. Sometimes it is also referred to as the Great Circle Route.

A great deal has been written, and there are thousands of opinions, about what type, style, size (length, beam, draft, air height), types of engine(s), etc. that the ideal Looper Boat should have/be and how it should be equipped for such an adventurous pleasure craft cruise.

The quick and safe answer is, that there ISN'T an ideal or perfect boat for doing the America's Great Loop Cruise. The Great Loop has been completed by almost every imaginable type of vessel from a personal water craft (PWC or Jet Ski) to large luxury yachts both power and sail, gas and diesel. Keep in mind the limiting factors for air height, draft and beam, each listed separately in the specifications below. Along some of the Loop's waterways, a "big" boat is between 26 and 32 feet, has a beam of 8-1/2 to 11 feet and draft under 4 feet. So, mega yachts are not recommended nor are they needed.

Equipping the boat for the Loop is another matter which we have addressed in several long-range cruising articles on our America's Great Loop Cruise "Smellin da Roses" web site, so we will limit this discussion to the vessel selection process and its amenities for individual lifestyles and cruising needs.

Before deciding on a particular boat to do the Loop-whether to go with your present boat or sell it and buy something else-you must consider: (1) your lifestyle. (2) the Great Loop route you wish to take and, (3) how you will use the boat once you have completed the Loop.

(1) YOUR LIFESTYLE:

Do you like to be indoors or outdoors? Do you like to sit in a recliner with your feet up or sit up straight with your feet on the floor? Do you like to read books and/or magazines, or prefer to watch TV, look at movies, listen to radio, etc.? Is photography and writing a log of your voyage a priority?

What about sending and receiving E-mail and going on the Internet?

Do you enjoy sight seeing, visiting museums, shopping, etc.? Do you enjoy meeting people and making new friends? Do you prefer wilderness and nature and and their quiet solitude? Do you plan to cruise by yourselves or do you plan on having guests aboard for much of your trip?

None of the answers to these questions are right and none are wrong: It is what's called different strokes for different folks, or why they make Chocolate, Vanilla, Strawberry and Moca-Nut-Banana-Coconut-Crunch!

(2) YOUR GREAT LOOP ROUTE:

The route you choose can be affected by your desire to see and do it all, or it can be affected by a particular time frame.

The full Loop includes the East Coast ICW, Chesapeake Bay, Jersey coast, Hudson River, Champlain Canal, Lake Champlain, Chambray & Richelieu Canals, Richelieu River, St. Lawrence Seaway, Rideau Waterway, 1000 Islands, Trent-Severn Waterway, North Channel, Great Lakes, Heartland Rivers, Tenn-Tom Waterway, Gulf ICW, Florida's Big Bend, Okeechobee Waterway, Florida Keys, and possibly the Bahamas, etc.

The intermediate route includes the Erie Canal to Oswego, NY, Lake Ontario and the 1000 Islands, the Trent-Severn Waterway to the Georgian Bay and Lake Huron, etc. The short route omits the Lake Champlain and Rideau Waterways, the Trent Severn-Waterway and goes from the Hudson River via the Erie Canal to Lake Erie, Lake Huron, Lake Michigan and then down the Heartland Rivers to Mobile, Alabama, etc.

(3) HOW YOU WILL USE YOUR BOAT AFTER THE LOOP:

Do you plan on continuing a long-range cruising lifestyle? Do you plan on becoming live aboards? Will your boat become a weekend and vacation get away? Will the boat become a floating condo? Or, will you do what lots of Loopers do; sell the boat and buy something more suited to your boating locale.

If you have made a list of all the questions listed above with your answers, you are ready to move on to the next section of this article. If not, go back and do a self evaluation before continuing further.

The point is, that most people do not change their likes or dislikes just because they start long-range cruising. We are all creatures of habit and will soon become miserable if we must change our lifestyle for the prolonged period of time that is required to complete the America's Great Loop Cruise-eight to 12 months or more.

Few couples have lived in such a confined space of perhaps 12 feet by 35 feet for any appreciable period of time in their marriage. If nothing else, the Great Loop is the ultimate test of a couples compatibility and commitment to each other (You will learn more about each other than you ever imagined!).

OK, let's get to the point of what makes an ideal or perfect boat in which to do the Great Loop. Let us rephrase that a bit by answering the question: "What to look for when deciding on a Looper Boat?"

BOAT SPECIFICATIONS AND AMENITIES YOU SHOULD CONSIDER

(1) Length: Ideally between 34 to 45 feet. Big enough for comfort, but not too big for the areas you will be cruising.

(2) Air height (height above water): You must be able to clear 19 feet 1 inch to do the Loop (the absolute limit at Chicago, with a high-water pool level), but ideally under 17 feet for the Champlain route (charted at 15-1/2 feet for flood stage) and to go thru downtown Chicago. So, 15-1/2 to 16-1/2 feet is ideal.

(3) Draft: 42 to 48 inches or less is ideal. Must be less than 60 inches on the Champlain route, 72 inches on the Heritage Canals, and you must sign a waiver if over 5-1/2 feet.

(4) Beam: Under 14 feet if possible. 12-1/2 feet is ideal to fit into most boat slips; otherwise, expect to be on a T-head, if available.

(5) House water capacity: 150 to 200 gallons is ideal (a minimum of 100 gallons).

(6) Holding tank (black water) capacity: 40 to 80 gallons is ideal (minimum 30 gallons).

(7) Electrical power: twin 30 amp versus one 50 amp. is recommended. Split on the boat from essential to non-essential (i.e. air conditioning as a non-essential on a separate circuit). Be prepared to live with a single 30 amp service and even one 15 amp service in a lot of places (buy one or two 30 amp female down to 15 amp male reducers).

(8) Accessibility: the ability to get to both the bow and stern easily, with wide walkways and good access from the helm to both the port and starboard sides of the boat for locking purposes.

(9) Anchors: two bow anchor system with both a Danforth and a Plow/Bruce anchor is ideal for the varying bottom types and/or for a twin 60 degree anchor placement. At least one anchor rode should have chain the length of the boat.

(10) A good water filter system (charcoal and sediment for all water taken aboard) and also a Nature Pure or Sea Gull water purifier at least at the galley sink and also for the ice maker if so equipped.

(11) If TV and video entertainment are important, consider a "marine" satellite TV antenna, VCR and DVD system for your boat (also recommended for Weather Channel).

(12) Recommended is a large saloon with at least two recliner/lounge-type seats. Many trawlers only have an L-shaped seating around the galley table in a galley/saloon area which doesn't fit very many lifestyles from a living room comfort perspective.

(13) A hard top bridge enclosure if possible (no need for a flying bridge). A pilothouse design with good side vision is ideal. If there is a canvas bridge enclosure, it should be as waterproof as possible unless the vessel has a lower station. A raised bridge or raised deck cruiser is also a good option versus a flying bridge.

(14) Having a washer and dryer or combination unit aboard (110 volt if possible) is ideal. If not, have lots of quarters for marina/town facilities, when available.

(15) Storage: The amount of storage is very important. The sheer volume of paper in the way of charts and guide books for the Loop is considerable. We actually shipped home charts and guide books along the way to gain more room (for gifts and souvenirs purchased). You can't bank on buying these navigation items along the way. Clothes, for hot, cool, and wet, take up a lot more room than normal summer boating wear. Food and staples supplies for a couple of weeks takes a lot more room than a week or two of cruising in your normal boating area where you know the locations of all the good stores and eateries. Cleaning supplies and all the extra gear and engine fluids stored in your dock box need to be taken aboard. Then there are the spare parts and engine manuals. Also, don't forget the office supplies such as a computer, printer, paper, envelopes, stamps, notebooks, pencils, pens, etc.

(16) Have an innerspring mattress made for your stateroom bed. A wise investment over a foam rubber mattress, particularly on hot summer nights. A good night's sleep is paramount. Remember, the bed and pillow you sleep on aboard must be as comfortable as the one you left at home!

(17) Last but certainly not least is the question of engine power. If your sole long-range cruising objective is to do the Great Loop and then become weekenders, occasional vacation cruisers or even snow birds, then the investment of an additional $75,000 to $100,000 or more for diesel engine(s) and generator may not be worth the added cost, and in fact might be an unwise investment for resale purposes.

If on the other hand, you plan on selling the old homestead and becoming long-range cruising liveaboards, definitely go for the big diesels which you may be able to amortize over an 8- to-10-year period of cruising.

Your boat will be your home for an extended period of time (8 to 12 months or more). Make sure you will be comfortable with your living conditions. If not, you and your crew will surely not get as much enjoyment as you should out of this boating experience of a lifetime.

As we noted earlier, the perfect Looper Boat really doesn't exist. Life is all about compromises, so select a boat that fits your lifestyle and your needs, not what others think you should have. Go to the boat shows, go to Trawler Fests and AGLCA rendezvous and spend extra time at the "Trawler Crawls" and "Looper Boats."

Buying the right boat for cruising the Loop is as important as buying a new home. Who knows, it may even become your new home!

2006. Two J's Communications. All international rights reserved.

-------------------------

About the authors

When John and Judy Gill cruised the Great Loop during the summers of 2002-04, they followed the Lake Champlain and Rideau Waterway route, thus, missing the Erie Canal. Since then, they chartered a canal barge boat to cruise the Erie and the Seneca-Cayuga canals. Next, they plan to charter a trawler out of Gore Bay on Manitoulin Island and to cruise the North Channel of Georgian Bay. The Gills did not visit the North Channel when on the Loop because of very low water in 2002 and because John's parents had a cottage near Sans Souci when he was a teen-ager.

Their boat, Two J's V, is a 36-foot Carver Mariner which they berth at Sassafras Harbor Marina, Georgetown, Maryland. They are members of America's Great Loop Cruisers Association, Pennsway Power Squadron and USPS Life Members, Orillia Power Squadron, CPS-ECP''.

I found the info on this sit http://www.trawlersandtrawlering.com...idealboat.html
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Old 11-25-2006, 11:04 AM
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Default Re: Help picking 1st BIG boat

I talked to a guy who did it in a Glacier Bay 34 (?--the new one) with his wife. They bought it new; did the trip; then traded it in for a new Glacier Bay 2680. Worked out the whole deal before they bought the 34; dealer helped them out.
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Old 11-25-2006, 12:04 PM
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soontobe42.... Great post, thanks...
Interesting and the second time I've heard experience say what I'm looking at is too big, or at least bigger than ideal

Sure seems to me bigger would be better.....
"(4) Beam: Under 14 feet if possible. 12-1/2 feet is ideal to fit into most boat slips; otherwise, expect to be on a T-head, if available." Makes sense too, and I know we'll be at a marina more than not. Dang, 12-1/2 beam boat just doesn't seem like enough space to spend a year in...
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Old 11-25-2006, 12:53 PM
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I have a 13 foot beam newer a proplem and can't remeber anyone have a proplem with a 15 beam ( on the east coast)
only proplem has a freind with a sail cat a 22' now has a power cat (pdq) at 18' no proplems that I know of one resone he went to a power cat
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Old 11-25-2006, 01:04 PM
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Default Re: Help picking 1st BIG boat

I have reead this thread with great interest as I have advised and sold quite a few boats to folks that took them on the Great Loop. First, In my opinion, the ony boat that will suitably do most, if not all what you require is a Trawler of some sort. The reason I say this is because that there is no other class of boats that holds their value like a good trawler will, some actually appreciate in value. Another factor, is that they are very economical and very sea worthy for the trip you are planning. In additon, I totally agree with Yacht Jim, there are FAR more comfortable on a long range cruise because of how quiet and vibration free that they are.

Another couple of Items that I consider MUST HAVES 1) Lower station in addition to a flybridge or a Pilot house. This will make operations in inclement weather much more comfortable and safer. 2) A good Invertor system. 3) Suffecient Ground Tackle for those great gunk holes along the way. 4) Fenders and Fender Boards for locking as well as adequate storage for these items. (nothing like a huge lazzarette!!)

Specific models that I can strongly suggest based upon hands on experience?

1) Kadey-Krogan 42 Trawler with a single Lehman or Perkins. Possibly the Wide body model. The Widebody may be a bit more of a handful while locking, but it can be done from the upper deck. Plenty of space for a dinghy, bikes etc and the mast has a tabernacle so it is easily lowerable for the one low bridge in Chicago.

2) Hans Christian/Cherubini 45' Independence. Easliy one of the most capable boats for what you want as well as one of the most overlooked making them a better value on the market than others. Great boat and rugged as an anvil.

3) DeFever. Either the 43 Trawler, the 44 Offshore Cruiser or the 44's Sister the 49 Cockpit. Good stuff and have the availability of twins if you are a twin engined kinda guy.

4) Sabreline 36 Aft Cabin. While not as economical as the trawlers above, they are of nearly impeccable quality and will give you a good turn of speed if you really want to. With a pair of 300 Cats she will cruise about 19 Knots and top at 23-24 Knots. Nicely cabined and easily handled.

5) Jefferson 42 to 45 foot Motor yachts. No cockpits but a viable alternative. Most were built with smaller diesels. While not speed demons they are economical and the Hershine Yard run by the Liu family has done a fairly good job building these boats since day one.

6) Island Gypsy 44' Flush Deck or the 44 Motor Cruiser.

7) Tiger 41 Similar to the Grand Banks 42 Classic in desigen, but in my opinion a better built boat from a yard that is better known for its much larger vessels. Because it is not a Banks, the values are really there by comparison.

8) Monk 36 Pretty nice stuff and are VERY popular on the market, values have been more akin to a good slow growth investment instrument than a boat. I can't remember if they have Washer/Dryer though.

9) Any of your Nordic Tug, American Tug, Pacific Trawler type boats if you are into the Tug Style.

10) Last, but damned sure not least Any Selene that falls into your budget. Great boats!!!

Of course the recommendations for any Hatteras Long Range Cruiser is a good one, the have been and will continue to be great boats.

Now, for the boats that I would specifically stay away from and the reasons. This may not be a popular section to my post, but I will be truthful and give you professional reasoning from a guy that has been in the Passagemaking Trawler business for a long time.

1) Any "dime a dozen" Boat..... Bayliner, Meridian, Carver, Cruisers, Silverton, Navigator etc. They build too many to even come close to mantaining the level of resale of any of the boats I mentioned above.

2) Grand Banks. This may be the most controversial comment I make. As far as I am concerned they are over-rated and over priced. Take a look at how many are currently on the market, when the supply is that great, the market that saturated there is too much downward pressure on pricing. Well built boats, particularly on the interiors, but too much exterior bright work to take care of. Also, their 42 Classic, 452 Europa and 42 Motor Yacht are built on semi displacement hulls that are not all that ecomical. I had a client that got better economy with his new 48 Ocean powered by MANS at 30 knots than he did with his two year old 42 GB Motor Yacht at 18 Knots. Final comment, you can get alot more for your hard earned money elsewhere.

3) Mainship 430 "Trawler" A trawler in name only, it too has a semi-displacement hull that is not at all that effiecient. With twin 300 Yanmars she will cruise in the 12 to 15 knot range and you will be lucky to get 3/4 mile per gallon. Piggish on fuel and too many exterior steps.... by time you get done running fore and aft during docking, your knees will be pleading with you, EVEN IF you haven't tripped and fallen a few time. And, By time you put your fenders, dock lines, power cords, etc away the tiny cockpit will be so full as to be worthless.

As a Final Note; with your budget and your goal, take your time. Find a broker that know's what the hell he/she is talking about when it comes to these boats and have them weed out the trash for you while acting as your representative, not that of the seller. Find a real SOB for a hull and engine surveyor that is hard as nails, but also fair as well as ones you can communicate with. Try not to limit your search to any specific geographic location (although it is best to keep it on the correct coast). I found the perfect boat for someone once in ARKANSAS!!! of all places, because I was thinking outside the box on where to look. Lastle, Take your time and give your broker and adequate amount of time to find the right boat and do the right thing, to include previewing the vessel for you.

One of my clients was recently looking for a 49' Lord Nelson Victory Tug, one of six ever produced and one of only 5 still afloat, of those, two are in Europe. I found him one that was not on the market, we negotiated a fair price, conducted preview, surveys, sea-trials, and the vessel is now his. This deal went so far as to finding the wherabouts of the original designer so that we could ask him specific questions about the model layup schedules and construction techniques. This was a project that began in April and closed in August. The client was in Maine, boat in Key Wst, Seller in Long Island and me in South Carolina. Don't let geography bother you.

Well that is my two cents.............. Just remember, "Fre advice is worth at least twice what you pay for it."
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Old 11-25-2006, 01:32 PM
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Is this the place or what?
Steve, THANK YOU...
You have a PM
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Old 11-27-2006, 04:33 PM
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Default RE: Help picking 1st BIG boat

I have read every post of this thread and it has been a great source of information. The interesting thing is that I never knew about the Loop trip and now I am thinking I would like to be a looper one day. The heck with retiring and buying a RV. My new goal is to retire, buy a trawler do the loop and the Caribbean.
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Old 11-27-2006, 06:06 PM
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Default Re: Help picking 1st BIG boat

great idea and sounds like a fun time ! tht does rule -where else could you get this info
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Old 11-27-2006, 09:16 PM
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Default Re: Help picking 1st BIG boat

You might consider a power catamaran like the Endeavour 44 or the PDQ 34. Both cruise in the teens and burn a lot less fuel than a sportfish or most trawlers like the Grand banks. Both have a lot of room, and are quite stable -- much less rolling. The PDQ 34 has become well-known and popular -- over 100 built -- and the resale market is very active. The PDQ is a great boat -- well built and easy to handle. Several people have taken them on Great Loop cruises.
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Old 11-27-2006, 09:22 PM
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Default Re: Help picking 1st BIG boat

Speaking of not letting geography get in the way of a good boat, take a look at Dutch steel trawlers. They wrote the book on inland cruising & efficiency over there. Biggest problems will be conflicts between European & North American hardware. Many boats are wired for 240V AC. Many of the brokers websites have English versions.
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Old 11-28-2006, 12:22 AM
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Default Re: Help picking 1st BIG boat

Get a Hatteras LRC. You could run it for the entire loop and sell it for what you paid. There is a great demand for these 20 year old boats.
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Old 11-28-2006, 08:51 AM
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Default Re: Help picking 1st BIG boat

Quote:
Doug in Bermuda - 11/27/2006 9:22 PM

Speaking of not letting geography get in the way of a good boat, take a look at Dutch steel trawlers. They wrote the book on inland cruising & efficiency over there. Biggest problems will be conflicts between European & North American hardware. Many boats are wired for 240V AC. Many of the brokers websites have English versions.

The Linssen (not sure of spelling) trawlers are a very nice boat, unfortunately in this country they do not enjoy the same popularity that the do in Europe, as s result the resale values here are not all that good. FOr whatever reason, styling, steel hull, etc they just have not caught on in the American market.

I agree on the Hatteras LRC's, but keep in mind that the majority of these are well over twenty years old. Have to be VERY careful on what you look at, particularly when it comes to wiring and blisters. Although, most blisters on all the boats I have witnessed survey on, have been cosmetic. There is only one vessel where the blisters were so bad as to cause a question of delamination. While the older Hat LRC's are nice, there are many, many quality alternatives.

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Old 11-28-2006, 09:15 AM
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Default Re: Help picking 1st BIG boat

Steveyacht, Think you have the name right. I had a look at the Linssen at the Annapolis show a few years back.

http://www.linssenyachts.com/index.php?taalid=3

Their biggest problem in the American market is that they are different. If you don't build what pretty much looks the same as everything else you are not likely to be successful in the US market. Everyone wants to stay in their comfort zone.

The European inland cruisers are designed for the challenges of low bridges, locks & even tunnels. Masts fold down. Windshields fold down. While a conventional high air draft boat has to wait for a bridge opening, boats like the Linssens slide on through without delay.

Here are a couple more N American builders who have nice cruisers. One very suitable for inland cruising. The other not quite as suitable.

http://www.zimmermanmarine.com/z36/yourz36/

http://www.northpacificyachts.com/

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Old 11-28-2006, 11:05 AM
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Default Re: Help picking 1st BIG boat

Doug, You are right, there are a great many vessels that will fit the needs of Afishinado's goal of transversing the Great Loop. His requirement for wanting the boat to hold as much value as possible severely limits his choices. There are damned few boats that will hold their values or actually appreciate in value over the period of time that he plans on using it, particularly after adding approximately 750 to 1000 hours of running time. In my opinion, this means a highly desireable trawler that will be economical, sea-worthy, stable and comfortable.

Of course, nothing is certain as far as resale is concerned, we have no crystal ball that can predict the economic climate when it comes time to sell. I remember how strong the market was for sportfishing yachts in the late 90's and early 2000..... until 9/11 happened along with the stock market collapse of the Dot Coms. OUCH....... that market is still on the soft side, 5 years later. Fortunately, the trawler market has remained steady and the demand has been growing in a fairly predictable manner and, in manys opinion, witll continue to do so as the boomers retire and want to get out of sailboats...... a trawler is the logical next step.

It will be interesting for him to keep this forum updated with his search and eventual purchase as well as an occassional report from the Loop! That would be very interesting.

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Old 11-28-2006, 11:06 AM
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Default Re: Help picking 1st BIG boat

Had the opportunity to cruise the ICW a bit on a couple of Hatteras - both CPMY (a 61' and a 74'). They were both great boats but the 61' might fit your needs better. It was a factory cockpit and featured a full walkaround that the 74' did not have. Great boats that offered plenty of options, inshore - offshore, and plenty of space. I would think a mid 80's 61' should be in your price range.

Also don't rule out a Hatteras Yachtfish. Narrower beam but still plenty of room. Here is an example of the yachtfish:

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi...oat_id=1499625

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Old 11-28-2006, 11:22 AM
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Default Re: Help picking 1st BIG boat

Been looking at steveyachts 'suggested' list... Will be fun actually kickin tires. We'll refrain from the 7kt sea trials until we get closer tho... Question Steve; How often do people really use the dinghy on the loop? I see all kinds from unknown little fibreglass ones to Whalers to inflatables. I do think I'd want one that could be hoisted with a davit onto the top, what's you thought on that?

Quote:
steveyacht - 11/28/2006 10:05 AM
It will be interesting for him to keep this forum updated with his search and eventual purchase as well as an occassional report from the Loop! That would be very interesting.
You can count on it... Even if it does put most to sleep...

Quote:
Bob's Cay - 11/28/2006 10:06 AM
the 61' might fit your needs better.
I think you missed the part in my post about $300k max, of which I want back. Some boat tho!
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