The Boating Forum - Towing a boat wider than 8'6", Rough estimate on what the oversize permits run?

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baranx3
01-13-2006, 08:16 AM
I'm considering a boat that's oversized in wideth. It's 9'6" wide. I wasn't even looking for one over the legal wideth will a friend pointed it out and it got me curious as to how much towing would be. I plan on keeping it in Delaware on a trailer where the access is only a quarter mile away and only towing it for the yearly trip to OBX. I wasn't that curious of an overwideth boatd before but with a family with kids I believe that it's something to look into. Towing weight is not a problem for my truck.

Now my question is what do you pay for oversize permits when your towing something that isn't commercial and how long are the permits good. When towing to OBX I'd be going through De, Md. Va. and NC.

Thanks in advance.


rockn n rollin
01-13-2006, 08:51 AM
i live in n.c. and( i think) that over 14 ft in n.c. is the maximum on a trailer before you have to have a permit. call n.c.d.m.v.

cheerios
01-13-2006, 09:14 AM
http://www.trailerboats.com/ try this sight, it has all the state towing laws.


jdfnav69
01-13-2006, 09:18 AM
The permits aren't all that expensive, but they will add up when you are talking across several states. The biggest problem is all the restrcitions you get hit with, like only towing Mon-Fri and during daylight hours. That's the one that makes most people decide to just take their chances and tow with no permit.

greyg8r
01-13-2006, 09:29 AM
FWIW, in Florida it's $30 / year (but a state DOT officer told me it only applied to commercial transporters, not recreational boaters...)

Jonafare
01-13-2006, 09:38 AM
In most states anything exceeding 8'-6" requires a wide load permit. I tow in NC, a 12 month permit was $100.00. We're headed to Fl next week, I got a permit company to get my permits... These travel permits are for a week only with a specific route and destination. For GA I had to supply proof of insurance. These 3 permits including the Permit Company fees was less than $150.00. There are restriction, daylight travel only, had to flag the truck and trailer. Can't tow in NC on Sunday or Holidays.

I I hesitated to permit the boat and I know a lot of folks run without them... my luck I'd get caught.

Hope this helps.

slowtroll
01-13-2006, 10:13 AM
greyg8r - 1/13/2006 10:29 AM

FWIW, in Florida it's $30 / year (but a state DOT officer told me it only applied to commercial transporters, not recreational boaters...)

You better take that DOT Officer with you if you travel to the keys. LE will write you up for towing an oversize boat because the law applies to everyone. They strictly enforce the law down there due to the numerous accidents that happen on US1. Not only do they enforce the size limits but they strictly enforce braking and lighting requirements. Your DOT Officer told you wrong.

marlin2002
01-13-2006, 01:50 PM
I two have been looking at boats and have run accross several that are just over the legal 8' 6" limit here in MD. If one does not permit an over length boat and would happen to get in an accident while towing I would assume your insurance company would hold you liable and not cover the damage. Am I correct in this assumption? Not to mention the fines.

YoungersGhost
01-13-2006, 01:55 PM
marlin2002 - 1/13/2006 2:50 PM

I two have been looking at boats and have run accross several that are just over the legal 8' 6" limit here in MD. If one does not permit an over length boat and would happen to get in an accident while towing I would assume your insurance company would hold you liable and not cover the damage. Am I correct in this assumption? Not to mention the fines.

I wouldn't make that assumtion. Kinda like saying: If you are driving drunk, we won't cover the damage. I doubt it.

SailCommodore
01-13-2006, 02:09 PM
We are in the process of getting permits for a trip from NC to OH. Any non-commercial load over 8'-6" is a wide load and needs a permit. The permit process and cost varies from state to state. You can spend a lot of time and figure it out for yourself.....or, hire one of the permit services. (Do a search here for names and web site.) Also google wide load permit and DOT. There is no national standard....yet. So every state is a little different.

To answer your question. In general $20-30/permit/state for a several day travel window. In some states you need other permits from other agencies for certain areas of travel. Most of the services will charge $20-30 service fee /permit so the cost is not really high. Consider getting a yearly permit in the state you live and tow in all the time. In OH it costs $50 for a year of self issue permits.

Jonafare
01-14-2006, 04:10 PM
marlin2002 - 1/13/2006 2:50 PM

I two have been looking at boats and have run accross several that are just over the legal 8' 6" limit here in MD. If one does not permit an over length boat and would happen to get in an accident while towing I would assume your insurance company would hold you liable and not cover the damage. Am I correct in this assumption? Not to mention the fines.

I was more concerned that if I had an accident, even if its the other guy's fault, I'd get the blame if I was running illegal. Man, what if someone was killed in this accident... imagine your liability.

CAPTDASH
01-15-2006, 12:40 PM
I run big trucks & have a 9'6 inch boat. I have to go through the scale houses with my big trucks, I DON"T HAVE to with my boat. I run by FL DOT all the time with my boat especially if you head through Pensacola. They have never stopped me except for pulling my Hydrasport, Too fast for conditions. I would not waste the money or the time worrying about these permits. If you just happened to get stopped, I would bet the fine would be no more than the permits anyway, so why bother? As for liability, if you hit something, I don't think they will get out & pull a tape on your boat. Most cops I know just write it up & clear the traffic. Don't worry with them, just go fishing & good luck.

tg
01-15-2006, 02:23 PM
CAPDASH brings up a good point about scales. If you have the oversize load signage you will be expected to stop for the load inspection/scale houses. Another reason not to get them. But as in all things, it's your call.

thomas70
01-15-2006, 07:31 PM
I would not worry. You can tow up 120" on a federal highway without a permit. I tow a 25 Luhrs alot and have never had a problem.

wiseguy
01-15-2006, 08:49 PM
I tow my boat to the coast in the spring and bring it back late fall. It is over width (10.5')
and over height (12.5') ... permit in NC is around $25 each way .... fine is $500.00 for each
item ..... with my luck I buy the permits :) :)

Porkchunker
01-15-2006, 09:13 PM
I have a 25' Parker with a 9'6" beam. I go ahead and get the permits. MD permit is $30 each way, or $60 for one month. I get the 1 month permit which gives me flexibility. The VA permits are $12 each way. Haven't looked into a 30 day permit in VA yet.

Get the permits. They are cheap compared to the hassle of a fine or an accident. Even if you escape ciminal violation, if the other party gets injured, can you imagine trying to defend yourself in a civil suit? Not sure how well the insurance company will stand behind you if you are breaking the law when the other party gets injured.

If you don't want the hassle of permits, stay with something that is 8'6".

UBETRUN
01-15-2006, 11:07 PM
I just bought a blanket permit in VA, $80 per year. The one-time permits are very restrictive, you have to list each highway/exit you plan to travel. With the blanket permit, you only need to follow state law for oversized vehicles (daylight, no Sunday, etc.), you don't need to detail your exact route.

joc
01-16-2006, 08:47 AM
And the misinformation abounds. It never ceases to amaze me, the dumbass comments made on this subject.
Someone thinks 12'6" is overheight (it isn't), someone thinks it's legal to tow 10ft or 14ft w/o a permit
(it isn't, usually), someone thinks the law only applies to big rigs ( surprise, we're all expected to follow the law) ,
and best of all, your insurance will be null and void. The ins companies would love that one. If you do
anything illegal or unsafe we're off the hook. Just think, if you're speeding( even by one mph), have an open
beer (that you haven't tasted), have a tail light out (even if it's daylight), fail to come to a complete stop at
least fifty feet BEFORE a stop sign ( like anyone ever does that) you're on your own. Bottom line, traffic laws
are written by the state. And new laws are passed every year. Sometimes city permits are also required.
Contact each state and get the facts straight from horse's a--, uh i mean mouth. About those blanket permits.
Since the state doesn't approve your routing each time, you're expected to keep informed of any travel restrictions.
If there is say, a construction zone, and your load won't fit, you're expected to know this BEFORE you get there
and cause a major traffic event. And did you ever try to back up several miles to the last exit or turnaround.
( I have. It's lots of fun.) All of that being said, a boat under 9'6" beam just isn't that big. Use some common sense,
avoid toll booths and narrow tunnels and you'll probably never be questioned. Untill some local guy figures
out that this is a good source of revenue. Kinda like the speed trap towns.

Porkchunker
01-16-2006, 08:56 AM
It is not the insurance company that I'm so worried about, but the civil suits that could follow. ... "Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, my client is permanently crippled and won't be able to play catch with her grandchildren, because this inconsderate, arrogant person decided to deliberably break the law, and tow an oversized boat on a trailer without a permit, and proper signs and flashing lights......."

Last time I checked my insurance, I have $1M liability (more than most people carry), but many civil judgments end up being in the tens of millions of dollars. So...pray tell me...who picks up the other $9M of a $10M judgment--certainly not the insurance company.

joc
01-16-2006, 10:02 AM
Pork, you're absolutely right. You should always remember, if you decide to bend or break the rules it's your butt that's on the line. You and only you will be doing the time and paying the piper. I always advised my clients to buy an umbrella policy, but how much is enough? You never know what will happen in the courts. Your personal liability extends to all your activities. If you decide to go for a walk on a dark rainy night while wearing dark clothes, the person that kills you may sue your estate for the mental anquish you caused them. I would think that if your vehicle not being properly flagged and signed were a contributing cause it would be a major issue. Say, a pedestrian stepped off the curb and was struck by your wide load, as opposed to being struck by your legal width truck that just happened to be towing a trailer . But these are legal issues, and you'll have to ask someone a lot smarter than I. I only suggest you contact the state to educate yourself on towing an oversize load. Your likely to get more accurate info.

wiseguy
01-18-2006, 07:02 PM
Boy am I sorry .... I miss spoke ( guess that makes me a dumb axx) when I said 12'6" ..went and got a my last permit .. it's for 10 wide and 14 high with overall length of 60'. They charge $12.00 for over with and $12.00 for over height. Sorry for the misleading info ... as was said it's probably best to call them :) :)



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