Marine Electronics Forum - Shakespeare Am-Fm Marine VHF Splitter - Is it any good?

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roberth
03-28-2012, 09:51 AM
Anyone used this and if so, is it any good? Before I install a new AM/FM antennae and mount on hardtop to make 3rd antenna, this seems to be a possible option.

Concerned if VHF antenna design will support good FM reception. Assume this device does not interfere with VHF performance or Shakespeare would not produce it?

Your thoughts and experience..........


TheSkipper
03-28-2012, 11:35 AM
I'm no radio expert, but I had one of those splitters on my last boat for 10 years and it seemed to work fine. I never had any problems receiving or transmitting with the VHF radio, and I always seemed to get good reception on my FM stereo.

savage
03-28-2012, 05:24 PM
I used to use one of those...

The local station that plays odd local music on Saturday and blues on Sunday (90.1) would be tough to get in the tow vehicle, and impossible to receive on the boat at the launch when I had a splitter.

Then I put a four foot Digital Antenna AM/FM antenna directly to the stereo, and I could get that same station, locked in - no breaks or dropouts, 20 and 30 miles offshore. Huge improvement.

If you have very high powered commercial stations with their antennae close to the coast - go with the splitter. If good music and range are important to you - get a dedicated antenna for your tunes.

Or be like the honey badger - and go XM/Sirrus


wingless
03-28-2012, 05:30 PM
That passive VHF / FM diplexor works fine.

Most receivers already have diplexor or triplexor devices built-in to split the antenna feed to various tuners or transmitters.

roberth
03-28-2012, 05:58 PM
Thanks for the feedback. I should have done a search on this subject earlier. I did so on Google and it led me to lots of posts no this directly from THT.

Most have had good experience, others have very valid points in regards to maintaining separate systems for higher reliability, safety for the vhf reliability, etc.

After reading more into this, I think I will go ahead and install the 3rd antenna and mount as some put it, it will look cool! But,for me and more than that, the area I boat does not have strong signals and just 7 miles up the coast, I am losing the reception to the only one station we like to listen to. So, I think I need to put up the 8' Shakespeare AM/FM antenna I removed last year to support two VHF's. Since I have the antenna and it is new, no cost other than to mount it.

Was just considering this as an option and will look for the highest reliability with separate antenna's. :)

savage
03-28-2012, 08:13 PM
You might try one of the inexpensive flexible wire antennas, and see if that meets your standards for the area broadcasters before buying a new mast, new mount, and running the cable.

Those are about nine dollars at Fry's - and under $40 at West Marine.

roberth
03-29-2012, 04:28 AM
I actually have the Tune Trapper FM antenna and it works quite well, but seems once I move offshore a bit, I still lose reception.

I dunno, but think that if I had an 8' antenna sticking up from my Hardtop vs this antenna laying inside the helm radio box, I will get better reception.

Seems when I first got my boat, it had a 8' VHF and 8' AM/FM antenna and I purchased the new stereo. It seemed that the reception wasn't very good with the 8' AM/FM antenna. But it was quite old/aged and assumed that was part of the issue. So pulled it down and installed new VHF and 8' VHF antenna to have redundant VHF's.
Then installed the Tune Trapper due to many folks very impressed and happy with it. I too am happy that it performs the same as the old AM/FM 8' that I removed, if I recall anyhow.

But, with a new AM/FM 8' that I already have in hand, hope that it will pull in that signal better than the Tune Trapper. However, I might find it doesn't.

We will see.........

Birdman
03-29-2012, 11:44 AM
What is a "radio station"? Does it have something to do with a "compass"?

polarred21
03-29-2012, 11:44 AM
Anyone used this and if so, is it any good? Before I install a new AM/FM antennae and mount on hardtop to make 3rd antenna, this seems to be a possible option.

Concerned if VHF antenna design will support good FM reception. Assume this device does not interfere with VHF performance or Shakespeare would not produce it?

Your thoughts and experience..........

My vhf caused serious feedback thru my stereo with this splitter. It is now a $60 ornament under my dash.

Birdman
03-29-2012, 12:49 PM
That means the cable was not grounded properly (aka the connectors were problably put on poorly). ;)

Magnolia Sun
03-29-2012, 02:53 PM
That means the cable was not grounded properly (aka the connectors were problably put on poorly). ;)

Birdman is correct. I have the "spiltter" on my 1st two boats w/o an issue. My last two, I had a dedicated AM/FM & VHF antennas to each source. I don't even use my AM/FM that much anymore (Sirrus makes-up most of our music) But....When the Red Soxs are playing then AM is my friend. Go ahead...Do the splitter.

Mid Shore Electronics
03-30-2012, 12:34 PM
The 4357-S am/fm band splitter made by Shakespeare does degrade VHF signal. I'm a shakespeare dealer and have noted this. In the Chesapeake Bay not a real big issue BUT off shore max range is limited but most boats have 2 VHF's and we do still install them



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