Dockside Chat - College Costs?

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hevysrf
03-24-2012, 11:04 AM
I have son due to start college fall 2013, first experience in our family. Just average GPA and SAT, active in sports, but not a Div.1 athlete. He also has some interesting extracurricular activities and circumstances. We have a high EFC.
What are your experiences with the "sticker prices" of schools. Is this process like going to a car dealership? Priced set in stone? How did your find a school that wanted a student like your child but still met their educational needs?
I have read up on FASFA, aware of the need to apply early, and the need to search even small scholarships.
We have toured 3 big name schools recently, lots of new construction going on at each school, reflected by big increases on already high tuition. Not sure of the value, but they had great stadiums, dorms and labs. Marty D


Boatless33
03-24-2012, 11:24 AM
There is a little play in tuition. I got some academic money at a few schools. I wasn't too thrilled at one of the offers I got and sent an email to the admissions department. They gave me a few thousand more per year. I ended up at a private school with no academic money and no financial aid. My parents weren't too thrilled at that. Tuition is up to 52k per year now at my school. I did get some money from my old high school. The guidance office had lots of scholarship applications and we got to fill out whatever we would qualify for. Other organizations such as churches sometimes offer scholarships. Unless things have changed, I think D2 schools can offer money for sports scholarships as well. D3 sports cannot.

Pierless
03-24-2012, 11:28 AM
Our son graduated 2010.

Being the first in family to go to college will cause some colleges to favor him.

The price is fixed. The financial aid provided by the school is not fixed. Aid can be a loan to be repaid or a grant which is given with no repayment required.

Playing a sport and getting backing from a Coach can be a very large positive. There are no athletic scholarships in D III but the Coach's hand picked guys have a much better chance of being accepted.

We were told our son should apply to "stretch" schools (hard for him to get in), schools where he was in the middle of what they accepted, and "easy to get into" schools.

SATs are important. Have him practice, practice and practice taking them. Look for a class on how to take the SATs.

I don't remember how many schools we traveled to so our son could see. It was a lot. It helped him figure out what he wanted (small college not in big city) and I think that helped him feel more confident during the application process.


Spooled
03-24-2012, 12:41 PM
Search for school within a price range

Dont expect to get Money unless in lower income levels

We looked at d2 d3 schools for my son-no free money was coming our way to these public universities.

He ended up at a D1 school that is costing the same as my daughters instate D3 school. he received money from the school just for his grades and SAT that brought the out of state costs inline with state schools.

Only difference is the transportation costs as its 6+ hours from our house. SJ Chapter of the Univ runs a bus for the breaks that cost 150 RT and drops hin off in Mt laurel-about 1.5 hours form home. Bus had wifi and he said it was great.

Do your homeowrk and dont expect alot of free help.

he plays on a club team and has fun with that

captbone
03-24-2012, 02:01 PM
I currently teach as an adjunct at two universities.

One great way to lessen the cost of college is to finish it in 3 years instead of 4.

The easiest way to do this is by taking CLEP exams.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/exam

The tests are around $100 and most schools do accept them. 3 credits for $100 is the best deal going. CLEP, AP and DSST are all basically the same. It works the exact same as if your child was taking AP classes in high school. You can get a study guide from Borders, Barnes and Noble...... for each exam. Double check that the school he wants to go to accept them and then get cracking ASAP.

Another option is to take classes online at the same time. Any accredited University online will transfer (just ensure the school is regionally and nationally accredited). Its burning the bridge at both ends. English 101 taken online for $1200 will transfer and save you $2k. Most universities will allow you to transfer 60 credits into their system. This summer your child can max out at a community college and possibly get 30 credits of basic 101 and general education going balls to the wall instead of working. The 30 credits is equal to full year and would cost $20-30k depending on the school vs. the $3k they would make working before they left for college.

I have helped several people and it works very easily.

Just my 2 cents.

My Turn
03-24-2012, 02:27 PM
Buy the book 'Debt Free U" by Zac Bissonnette and read it cover to cover. Great start in understanding the financial aid and college cost game. My son goes off this fall. He is down to Siena, Grove City, or Wofford. He has gotten significant aid from all 3. Believe me it is a process.

triguy7
03-24-2012, 02:42 PM
Mine played sports and wanted to play Division I (as most do). We found a private Div I school and it worked for us. Covered about 40% of the costs - still a lot of money was spent over the 5 years (hurt knee/one year).

There were Div 2 Colleges that would have paid 100% but that is not what she wanted.

Sudden Strike Fishing
03-24-2012, 03:59 PM
My son just signed a letter of intent to play at a private NAIA school which is like a D2 so they can give athletic money. His scholarship will cover about half the tuition with his Florida Prepaid College money being able to be applied there and other FAFSA grants our out of pocket will be minimum. One D3 school he liked was $43,000 a year and they came up with $28,000 a year in none athletic aid but it was not good enough.

triplenet
03-24-2012, 04:07 PM
You said his SAT/ACT/GPA is average..... Not sure how it is in NJ - but here in Florida its very difficult to get into good schools unless you are straight A's and have an amazing SAT/ACT...

All the schools have est cost page you can review ...

Schmaltz~Herring
03-24-2012, 04:19 PM
Another reason to love GA, I pay NOTHING for U.G.A. tuition, thanks to the HOPE scholarship, son is in honors, semester in D.C., 4.2 average, highest SAT in H.S.. He buys his books on ebay and resells them. :)

ladyjane
03-24-2012, 04:59 PM
Another reason to love GA, I pay NOTHING for U.G.A. tuition, thanks to the HOPE scholarship, son is in honors, semester in D.C., 4.2 average, highest SAT in H.S.. He buys his books on ebay and resells them. :)That is what lawyers teach there kids good going!

hevysrf
03-24-2012, 05:25 PM
GPA, SAT is a problem, UPenn was on our list because of its financial aid policy, but he would need to raise his numbers 50%. Two concussions last football season are another. He is taking advantage of some college level work now.
Boatless33, do you feel that the 52 k school is worth it? Are the Labs better? Are the Profs doing meaningful research or just marking time? Lots of intern programs? Are most grad recruited immediately? You may have sailed against my son if you went to SPYC.
We have a 2 year community college affiliated with a major university nearby, but it scares me because the completion rates for its degree programs are pitiful. Thanks MartyD

PF-88
03-24-2012, 06:11 PM
A state university will give you the best value in a education over the inflated cost of a private university and the large debt upon graduation. Check out "Bestmoneyinfo.com" on college education.

Buoy Scout
03-24-2012, 06:20 PM
A state university will run you about $20k/yr all in. One way to cut the costs is start with 2 years at a community college, and transfer to a 4 yr. university. In VA, there is a program that guarantees all your credits transfer.

Another option is a co-op program. Work a semester, go to school a semester. This works well with engineering programs.

Above all, make sure the degree they select will support a job after graduation. A fine arts degree vs. business or technology makes a big difference.

TundraFish
03-24-2012, 06:32 PM
I did not live in the same area but I was in college not so long ago in Florida.

Doing the first 2 years in a community college is not a bad idea at all. You can save a lot of money. It is silly to pay top dollar for the first two years. The first two years are going to be taking all the basic requirements, humanities, history, some basic math, etc. I had friends who paid an arm and a leg to take these basic courses at expensive out of state schools.

Not trying to brag but I was in the top of my class in High School, I still did my first two years in a community college, I was able to enroll in an Honors Program, I was getting paid to go to school, seriously. After that I transfered to a university (University of Florida) and did my Bachelors in Civil Engineering. I also ended up doing my Masters, which cost me an arm and a leg and came out of my pocket.

My suggestion is to go for the community college, unless the local college is a really terrible school. Some colleges like the one I attended have special transfer programs to other schools. Regarding scholarships, there is usually a lot out there, sometimes it's a matter of finding them and applying to as much as possible.

Also, my advice to always take as many classes as possible. The faster he finishes the better. I was lucky enough that I did not have to work so I busted my ass, never had a summer off.

Lastly, it is all worth it. I am just sttarting my career and saving to buy my first offshore boat!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

captbone
03-24-2012, 06:38 PM
A state university will give you the best value in a education over the inflated cost of a private university and the large debt upon graduation. Check out "Bestmoneyinfo.com" on college education.

I dont know if this is always true. I have seen cases where a State school is $20k per year and Harvard is $55k but you get $35k in financial aid per year. Some private schools end up being less in the end because you get more aid which I feel is crap.

snapperkid
03-24-2012, 07:03 PM
College ain't for everyone. Ask Steve Jobs or Bill Gates...

My Turn
03-24-2012, 07:05 PM
The aid thing is a big game. With good grades (93 average) and good SAT (1300) my son is getting enough merit and need based aid to bring the private (50k) schools within 4k or so of the state school price.

In addition to my previous advice, don't be afraid to apply to the "expensive" schools. They give out a lot more aid.
Also, doing the first 1 or 2 years at a CC can be an excellent strategy if money is real tight.

John_Madison CT
03-24-2012, 08:43 PM
My son will be entering college Sept. of 2013.. He already knows is choices are the State University system. I cannot understand why parents spend $55K/year for a mediocre NEast college when the State Univ. system is such high quality at a reasonable cost. (i.e Univ. of CT is $23k/year)

CLang
03-25-2012, 04:06 AM
My wife went back to school three years ago.....second degree for her...state university....I shell out about 7,000 a year in tuition and probably another 3-4000 in books and supplies. Not to mention the new laptop she needed for design software. state run universities are the way to go, most bang for the buck IMO. She'll finish next year with no college debt and she already has job offers in her new field. In Louisiana we have what is called TOPS....its basically free tuition to graduating HS seniors who qualify....get that GPA and that SAT score up, cus it most cetainly matters.......what major is he looking into???

magua
03-25-2012, 04:43 AM
A state university will run you about $20k/yr all in. One way to cut the costs is start with 2 years at a community college, and transfer to a 4 yr. university. In VA, there is a program that guarantees all your credits transfer.

Another option is a co-op program. Work a semester, go to school a semester. This works well with engineering programs.

Above all, make sure the degree they select will support a job after graduation. A fine arts degree vs. business or technology makes a big difference.

Substitute health for business and I think they have a better chance. There are an awful lot of unemployed business majors out there right now in grad school and I cannot figure out why they would spend more money on an education that will not pay off.

Engineering/Technology or Health all the way.

auntiepaula
03-25-2012, 05:22 AM
I lived at home with my parents and did two years of community college for $225 per semester and worked about 25 hours per week. I saved up a load of money so after I got my associates degree in accounting, I went to Providence College (very expensive school) to get my BS in Business but I only had two years of the expensive school. After graduating from PC, I went to school in Boston to get my doctorate. By doing the communty college gig for 2 years, I was able to save enough money so that when I graduated from PC, I didn't have any loans to pay off. I suggest you think along these lines or consider a state school for the full 4 years. Unless your son is a genius and is an MIT type kid, there's no reason why he "needs" to go to some expensive private college. It's all about what your son does while in school. He makes his future. The school doesn't make it for him. A kid applying for a job who has a 3.5 gpa from a state school vs. a 2.9 gpa applicant from the private school.....who do you think will get the job? The so-called big name of the private school won't matter. It's what the kids does while in school that counts.

baypro21
03-25-2012, 05:55 AM
My son will graduate from ECU in a few weeks. Our total costs turned out to be right at $15k per year for these 4 years. $60k total for the 4 yrs. That included being in a dorm the 1st year, food, tuition, books, etc (total). The 2nd, 3rd, and 4th yrs he was in a 4br shared apt. with 3 other guys.

I'm a poor boy but evidently not in the eyes of grant money and financial aid dolers. We paid for everything with current income but I would suggest people save ahead of time. It has been difficult at times because my income is seasonal. Now that we've finished paying it's time for mama's new addition and kitchen.

He held up his end of the bargain by graduating in 4 yrs. Before he started I told him I would pay as long as he stayed on schedule (I'm not paying 6 ys for a 4 yr degree). I told him if he got sidetracked with partying or whatever then he could move back home and go to comm college for 2 yrs.

He did the hard work and we have gotten several academic recognition letters over those 4 years and now he is ready to get out of there. He says this last semester is dragging and they are covering lots of material. He will be getting his business finance degree.

Brad1
03-25-2012, 06:14 AM
I lived at home with my parents and did two years of community college for $225 per semester and worked about 25 hours per week. I saved up a load of money so after I got my associates degree in accounting, I went to Providence College (very expensive school) to get my BS in Business but I only had two years of the expensive school. After graduating from PC, I went to school in Boston to get my doctorate. By doing the communty college gig for 2 years, I was able to save enough money so that when I graduated from PC, I didn't have any loans to pay off. I suggest you think along these lines or consider a state school for the full 4 years. Unless your son is a genius and is an MIT type kid, there's no reason why he "needs" to go to some expensive private college. It's all about what your son does while in school. He makes his future. The school doesn't make it for him. A kid applying for a job who has a 3.5 gpa from a state school vs. a 2.9 gpa applicant from the private school.....who do you think will get the job? The so-called big name of the private school won't matter. It's what the kids does while in school that counts.

I went to community college for two years as well. I then transferred to a small private school (Point Park) here in Pittsburgh where I obtained my BS in computer science. I agree with the above poster that you can save alot of money by going that route. However, since I graduated, things have improved for someone who wants to go that route. When I transferred, Point Park didn't accept 15 of my 65 credits. Now, there are many schools in this area that will accept all of the credits from a community college, provided you map out your ciriculum ahead of time with the 4 year school, they pre-approve the tranfer.

My first job out of school, I worked with a team of 6 people (including myself) The other team members graduated from Stanford, Alabama, Notre Dame, MIT, and some school in India.

jcbadabing
03-25-2012, 06:32 AM
I have one in college now, the second one starts next year. Completing the FASFA form should give you some idea of whether you will qualify for aid based on need.

In response to OTP earlier question.... is it worth going to a school with $52K tuition? Absolutely not, not unless you are getting a hefty chunk of financial aid.

First consideration is what will your kid be studying. Nubian Arts & Anthropology as a major doesn't play real well right now in the job market. Also, some courses of study or career paths really require you to get a bachelors and a masters before looking for a good job.

Sounds like your kid has average grades and test scores. Chances are, if you're making $60-80K or more a year, you are not gonna get much if any financial aid. Focus on state schools. In NC, we have a program where you can complete 2 years of a 4-year curriculum at a community college, then transfer over to a 4-year school with full credit for your coursework. If you have something similar in your state, it is the best deal going.

bridgeman
03-25-2012, 06:59 AM
My daughter starts this fall, me and my wife both work full time have slightly above average incomes (50K ea.) we don't have a lot of outstanding debt. We only have one child and filled out the FAFSA form and it states that we may be eligible for a direct stafford loan for 9500 per year, what I consider a joke is that they estimate we can contribute 22,316.00 per year for expected family contribution (EFC). My daughters GPA is around 3.8 and her SAT's were 1310 so she's probably going to get some help there but it looks like to me we'll be eating beans for the next four years. The real kick in the a$$ is we live about 15 miles north of the West Virginia line and if we lived in W. Va her tuition would be covered with the promise program. Don't want to rant but I feel if we were divorced and addicted to heroin she'd be eligible for a full ride.

gordo35
03-25-2012, 07:21 AM
I was an A and B student in advanced placement classes and made a 24 on my ACT. I graduated HS in 1993 and was offered full rides to smaller D1 schools(Nicholls St, McNeese St, Centennary, etc) and some D2 schools for basketball, but ended up going to a D3 school because of the academic reputation of the school at that time. IIRC, I received about $13K/year and it cost around $20K/year for tuition, room, board, and books when I started and was about $25K/year when I finished. They originally were only able to come up with $8K/year. When I told the coach that I would have to go to a different school the financial aid increased to what was acceptable.
One other thing....while the school(Millsaps College) that I went to had a great reputation locally, a majority of folks outside of a 200 mile radius had no idea of the quality of school, or where it was located. I believe that there is something to be said about the "name brand recognition" of a larger state school to the general public and it is easier to network with a broader alumni base.

skindr
03-25-2012, 07:57 AM
Just playing devil's advocate here: With recent headlines telling us that about 1/2 of kids who have graduated college moved back in with parents because of no jobs, and large numbers of law schools facing lawsuits for false promises about job prospects after incurring $200k in debts upon graduation, maybe financally,college is not the way to the promised land ??
An undergrad education ,with a relatively worthless degree could easily cost 150k. Maybe investing that into a business and putting the 10 hours studying into time at the business, the investment has a better chance of sucess. Of course if yours is the straight A kid this won't apply.
Many businesses are out there , and example is one of my daughters' friends starting buying kiosks at the local busy mall. Cost 25k or so. Since he lives at home, he plows all profits back and now owns 10 kiosks is malls in Fl. and even 1 in Vegas! He does put in 10-16 hr. days but now employs his whole family . Figure even a 10k net per kiosk and he's making more than my engineer daughter ! Just saying ....

hevysrf
03-25-2012, 09:26 AM
Yes, we have a $25k EFC, Yes we live in a state where even instate schools are expensive,and I know that many students take 6 years , and many never get degrees. Of 6 nieces and nephews that are recent college grads, all are successful, but I credit networking with 3 of their employment situations.
They have 35 years of college between them with 1 mom now in section 8 housing and 2 sets of parents with foreclosed homes.
I look programs like http://www.engr.udel.edu/student_orgs/sae.html or http://www.lehigh.edu/~inmem/f-composites.html and I think thats what could offset the cost of the 4 year, dedicated involvement in an ongoing project related to your major.
I think my son is aware of the alternatives to college, he see's what I do and the hours I put in, but he wants to try it. I admit we have spoiled him so far but he knows his name will be on the loans for school..

capecuddy
03-25-2012, 09:34 AM
I got two kids through great schools. Let me tell you this.....what ever you think it's gonna cost, it's gonna cost 25% more. I used to say when they were both in at the same time that it was like driving a new Toyota Camry off a cliff every few weeks!

Spooled
03-25-2012, 09:36 AM
My daughter starts this fall, me and my wife both work full time have slightly above average incomes (50K ea.) we don't have a lot of outstanding debt. We only have one child and filled out the FAFSA form and it states that we may be eligible for a direct stafford loan for 9500 per year, what I consider a joke is that they estimate we can contribute 22,316.00 per year for expected family contribution (EFC). My daughters GPA is around 3.8 and her SAT's were 1310 so she's probably going to get some help there but it looks like to me we'll be eating beans for the next four years. The real kick in the a$$ is we live about 15 miles north of the West Virginia line and if we lived in W. Va her tuition would be covered with the promise program. Don't want to rant but I feel if we were divorced and addicted to heroin she'd be eligible for a full ride.


WVU will let you pay instate tuition if your state school s dont offer a program that WVU does-I know someone who is taking advantage of this situation this year.


I agree with the "Name" schools can help in getting better job Interviews perhaps opportunities that a above poster merntioned. My son is going into secondary ed so whether he graduates form a D1 or aD3 school it doesnt matter. But some career paths would be better served by paying UPFRONT for the name to get situated in a better job

LI Sound Grunt
03-25-2012, 10:08 AM
I have son due to start college fall 2013, first experience in our family. Just average GPA and SAT, active in sports, but not a Div.1 athlete. He also has some interesting extracurricular activities and circumstances. We have a high EFC.
What are your experiences with the "sticker prices" of schools. Is this process like going to a car dealership? Priced set in stone? How did your find a school that wanted a student like your child but still met their educational needs?
I have read up on FASFA, aware of the need to apply early, and the need to search even small scholarships.
We have toured 3 big name schools recently, lots of new construction going on at each school, reflected by big increases on already high tuition. Not sure of the value, but they had great stadiums, dorms and labs. Marty D

There is great financial advice here I am sure. I also taught in briefly at a local State College and now the local High School part time in my retirement. And, sent 3 of my own through public and private schools. Since you didn't mention much about your child's thoughts or interests, I offer this a bit off topic but perhaps as important: Whatever you spend and whatever it costs will be wasted if the kid doesn't want to be there. I didn't even have this discussion with one of my kids assuming he would like a certain school AND wanted to go to college. Long story short ...Bye Bye $40,000. He then took a year to grow up and then finished at a different school about 7 years later and now is happy and gainfully employed. So all I am saying is 1 - It is YOUR decision - he does need YOUR guidance - but 2- also just listen to the school conselors, teachers and your son as part of the decision making process.

I can remember taking my daughter to one campus for a visit and said Ok lets get out - she wouldn't even get out of the car saying these kids aren't like me - Of course I said well, that's part of the experience and she said no really this isn't for me....;?

Wicked Awesome
03-26-2012, 04:05 PM
I know exactly what you are going through, hevysrf. My family just spent the last week doing college tours. We looked at 3 Florida public universities and 1 private college. In three of the four tours the admissions staff spent a significant amount of time discussing merit based aid. The message was that almost everyone who applies early gets some merit based aid. We finished our group of tours totally confused about the real cost of a four year degree. College costs at these schools seem like a car dealership where no two people pay exactly the same amount. FYI, the one private college we looked at provided merit based aid to about 85% of their students, with an average amount in the $18,500 per year range. Two of the three public schools mentioned giving aid to most or all students as well. At that point you have to wonder what the 'real' tuition is.

For those that question a 4 year degree I would submit that a college degree is the new high school diploma. It does not guarantee you a job, but makes you eligible for job opportunities which would not be available without a degree.

the_gooch
03-27-2012, 07:17 AM
Friend of my wife just got back from the NE visiting some "prestigious" schools. He got the message that his daughter's tuition would be based on how "privileged" they are. Sliding scale based on income. Sound familiar?

beber
03-27-2012, 07:44 AM
I am 30 years old and have spent 8 of the last 12 years going to college (1 undergrad degree and 2 masters). In my experience state schools offer the best education. They receive the most applicants, due to lower tuition, and get to choose the best students. It is a very competetive atmosphere. They also have some of the nicest facilities thanks to your tax dollars. Unfortunately (JK), like you and your son I am originally from NJ as well, and NJ has very high in state tuition at its universities.

The tuition at private schools is much higher, but there is also the opportunity for a lot more scholarships and aid through these schools than the state schools. Rutgers may cost ~$20k a year, and Seaton Hall may be ~$40k, but taking into account aid and scholarships, the out the door price of the two schools will probably be within ~$5k of each other.

My other bit of advice is don’t get overly caught up in the quality of labs, or how distinguished faculty may be for undergrad. In all reality your son will maybe use the fancy labs 2 or 3 times, and rest of the time undergrads use the crummy old labs in the basement. Grad school is where this comes into play. I’d be more concerned over faculty to student ratios. For undergrad it may be better to be in more of a learning environment than a research environment.

The best advice I can give, is pick the school that your son feels the most comfortable at.

gameon
03-27-2012, 09:24 AM
This is a smart kid...I do some hiring for a major engineering company and I really don't care that a kid went to a community college for his first 2 years. In fact after they have a few years of experience I rarely care what college they went too. I see a prestigious college as more like bragging rights. Don't get me wrong if you are smart enough to make through MIT, Harvard or Yale go for it because in some professions it does help. But don't go into 10 years of debt to say you went to some school just for the name.I did not live in the same area but I was in college not so long ago in Florida.

Doing the first 2 years in a community college is not a bad idea at all. You can save a lot of money. It is silly to pay top dollar for the first two years. The first two years are going to be taking all the basic requirements, humanities, history, some basic math, etc. I had friends who paid an arm and a leg to take these basic courses at expensive out of state schools.

Not trying to brag but I was in the top of my class in High School, I still did my first two years in a community college, I was able to enroll in an Honors Program, I was getting paid to go to school, seriously. After that I transfered to a university (University of Florida) and did my Bachelors in Civil Engineering. I also ended up doing my Masters, which cost me an arm and a leg and came out of my pocket.

My suggestion is to go for the community college, unless the local college is a really terrible school. Some colleges like the one I attended have special transfer programs to other schools. Regarding scholarships, there is usually a lot out there, sometimes it's a matter of finding them and applying to as much as possible.

Also, my advice to always take as many classes as possible. The faster he finishes the better. I was lucky enough that I did not have to work so I busted my ass, never had a summer off.

Lastly, it is all worth it. I am just sttarting my career and saving to buy my first offshore boat!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

CayoHueso
03-27-2012, 09:54 AM
In Florida, and probably in other states, the community college approach can have another advantage, that SAT or any college board scores don't matter. You don't need to take any test for entry into a community college. With an associate degree for college transfer, you are guaranteed admission into any state university, even the most selective. It's a back-door approach to get in.

artie159
03-27-2012, 10:01 AM
The wife went to the community college to start and finished at a four year school. Saved money and it worked out fine.
My son went to a four year private school ( Worcestor Polytechnic Institute ) for Electrical and Computer Engineering ( Graduated in 2011 ) and he is doing real well.

My opinion , go to the local community college to start and transfer. Why graduate with debt that will take 20 years to pay off.

toby10
03-27-2012, 11:01 AM
Another vote for the community college route. Our daughter was able to take dual enrollment courses in high school-at half the community college per credit price. She placed in 3rd semester Spanish and was told if she had a B in the class, the school would give her the credits for semesters 1 and 2. So, 8 credits for FREE and they counted against her Humanities requirement. She will need to take one summer class and have her associates degree in one year-at a cost of approxiately $6500!!!! That cost is about one semester at her transfer school-including room and boars which of course she did not have to pay at CC.

You do need to be careful and ensure that any credits taken will be credited to a specific requirement. It does you no good if they fall into the "elective" credit bucket!!

Any program specific courses should be linked to the sequence of the transfer school to ensure the prerequisites are in the correct order. Your child could fall behind-and need an "extra" semester if you are not wary

triplenet
03-27-2012, 01:21 PM
With an associate degree for college transfer, you are guaranteed admission into any state university, even the most selective. It's a back-door approach to get in.

Dont think thats correct.... Your credits are guaranteed - but you only gain entry to the other schools based on availability and GPA... Meaning, you cant get an AA in community college and automatically transfer into UF .... You still need to qualify with grades and there has to be availability

ericinmich
03-27-2012, 02:04 PM
I plan on making my kids do a business plan with business case and ROI.

the_gooch
03-27-2012, 05:18 PM
Dont think thats correct.... Your credits are guaranteed - but you only gain entry to the other schools based on availability and GPA... Meaning, you cant get an AA in community college and automatically transfer into UF .... You still need to qualify with grades and there has to be availability

True. You are guaranteed entrance TO a state school, not necessarily the one you want.

CayoHueso
03-27-2012, 05:46 PM
Dont think thats correct.... Your credits are guaranteed - but you only gain entry to the other schools based on availability and GPA... Meaning, you cant get an AA in community college and automatically transfer into UF .... You still need to qualify with grades and there has to be availability

In the case of UF it's a "C" average. Otherwise according to Florida statute 240.115:
"The articulation agreement must specifically provide that every associate in arts graduate of a Florida community college shall have met all general education requirements and must be granted admission to the upper division of a state university except to a limited access or teacher certification program or a major program requiring an audition."

There are limited exceptions into specific programs within a college.

This link has a bit more info. http://www.highereducation.org/reports/transfer/transfer10.shtml

triplenet
03-27-2012, 06:46 PM
In the case of UF it's a "C" average. Otherwise according to Florida statute 240.115:
"The articulation agreement must specifically provide that every associate in arts graduate of a Florida community college shall have met all general education requirements and must be granted admission to the upper division of a state university except to a limited access or teacher certification program or a major program requiring an audition."

There are limited exceptions into specific programs within a college.

This link has a bit more info. http://www.highereducation.org/reports/transfer/transfer10.shtml

I am fairly confident that what I stated is correct ... You cant just walk into UF because you received an AA from a community college.... There has to be availability in the program, you need the grades and meet all the prerequisites ... I reviewed the 2+2 documents and it specifically stated that you were not guaranteed the school - just that your credits would be transferable...

If you were correct - every kid would start in community college then transfer to UF guaranteed - its just not the case...

CayoHueso
03-28-2012, 05:42 AM
I'm speaking from personal experience.

triplenet
03-28-2012, 06:00 AM
I'm speaking from personal experience.

:thumbsup: Congrats

I am sure your program had "availability" at the time.... I just dont want people to think they can go to Community College in Florida - get a C average and then transfer to the top school in in the State - UF requires straight A's and a very high SAT/ACT score as a freshman ... There is way more to it.. :grin:



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