Trucks & Trailers - welding galvinized steele

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View Full Version : welding galvinized steele


lime4x4
03-26-2011, 11:04 AM
I recently bought a 1979 grady white 201 marlin. The trailer i beleive is unique to the boat. The boat has a roundish flat bottom at the stern but a deep V in the front. So i would like to keep the trailer. The problem with the trailer is the axle support tubes have rusted thru. If i grind all the coating off is it just like welding regular steele? My idea was to purchase new square tubing and weld onto the frame. https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_wdfpFhXfipU/TY4pYlCriZI/AAAAAAAABv8/NeQq-tNBgEA/IMG_4625.resized.JPGhttps://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_wdfpFhXfipU/TY4pYdwHkNI/AAAAAAAABv4/wBP5IF69gN0/IMG_4624.resized.JPGhttps://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_wdfpFhXfipU/TY4pYU2WyPI/AAAAAAAABv0/JseEFCR0gwk/IMG_4620.resized.JPGhttps://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_wdfpFhXfipU/TY4pJzY3Z-I/AAAAAAAABvw/5M65hUqCsqU/IMG_4619.resized.JPG


divefreak
03-26-2011, 11:31 AM
If i grind all the coating off is it just like welding regular steele?

basically yes.....:thumbsup:

jetboat69
03-26-2011, 12:04 PM
You can do it but!!..
Beware of fumes coming off the galvanized parts when you grind or weld.
Do it outside and wear an approved respirator. You will see brown yellow smoke coming from the galvy and It smells and tastes like sulfur. You don't want to breath this stuff in.
I do it occasionally but am extremely careful. Outside, upwind and respirator.


polarred21
03-26-2011, 12:23 PM
You can do it but!!..
Beware of fumes coming off the galvanized parts when you grind or weld.
Do it outside and wear an approved respirator. You will see brown yellow smoke coming from the galvy and It smells and tastes like sulfur. You don't want to breath this stuff in.
I do it occasionally but am extremely careful. Outside, upwind and respirator.

:thumbsup: X2

I welding galvanized and galvaneal for years. The fumes can send you to the hospital, beleive me. People do it everyday, need good ventilation and don't stand in the path of the exit gas while you are welding.

Grind away weld areas first before welding. Galvanized coatings are conductive and it will let you strike an arc through it, but when it burns it realeases impurities in the weld zone that can cause porosity when finished.

Don't get too excessive on how far away from the weld joint you grind for rusting issues. You can buy some pretty good galvanized spay paint at the parts store, get a good brand $$$.

Good luck :)

go fish
03-26-2011, 05:43 PM
Cox built a fine trailer years ago. Too bad they closed up years ago. They were one of the few that had their own hot dipped galv tank.

Curmudgeon
03-27-2011, 02:13 PM
I personally don't want a 'patched' trailer. Galvanized trailers usually corrode from the inside, so you can bet there's more you can't see. There's nothing unique about your Grady shape, or the trailer under it. Start with name brands until you find what suits you ... ;)

capehaze
03-27-2011, 05:58 PM
Ditto on the zinc fumes. Sometimes called "Metal Fume Fever" - not good!

No worry if you remove ALL the galvanizing from the weld zone. Another important reason to remove the zinc is that it can contaminate the weld puddle and make it prone to cracking. For an example and interesting reading:
http://www.metassoc.com/pdf/MAI_Minutes-6_04.pdf
I run an SEM/EDS lab, but not for these guys...

If you have a hot-dip galvanizing shop near you and can get the parts there, it would be good to do after repairs are made.

Woody

DoubleO7
03-28-2011, 08:43 AM
Make sure the rest of the trailer is good enough to repair.
That tube rusted out from the inside. The same can be happening throughout the trailer.
You might get an idea by tapping areas with a hammer to hear a thickness difference.
Or use an ultrasonic metal thickness gage if you can find one.
In one of your pics it looks like the large under slung tube is rusty too.
Is there drain holes in the bottom of the rusted out vertical tube?

Kinda odd rust out as the pics appear to show the opposite wall of the tube has galvanizing on the inside. Yet the rusted out area may have had none.

bamaboy473
03-29-2011, 07:55 AM
Make sure the rest of the trailer is good enough to repair.
That tube rusted out from the inside. The same can be happening throughout the trailer.


Exactly. You might find that the whole section is too rusted to weld to, because it's unlikely that one part would rust through while an adjacent part would be like new...not when they're both made the same and are both placed under the same conditions.

This is especially true of horizontal pieces that can retain moisture. If the vertical piece is degraded, then the horizontal box member ought to be real bad, too.

Let us know what you find.

rwidman
03-29-2011, 10:06 AM
Ditto on the zinc fumes. Sometimes called "Metal Fume Fever" - not good!

No worry if you remove ALL the galvanizing from the weld zone. Another important reason to remove the zinc is that it can contaminate the weld puddle and make it prone to cracking. ........

If the trailer was hot dipped when it was made, it would be impossible to remove all the galvanizing because the inside of the tubes would be galvanized.

DoubleO7
03-29-2011, 12:40 PM
If the trailer was hot dipped when it was made, it would be impossible to remove all the galvanizing because the inside of the tubes would be galvanized.
Not likely welding anything to the inside surface.
Patching over the top will only require removal of the galvan in the weld path, maybe a half inch wide.
Just don't go sniffing the drain hole in that tube after welding.



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