Trucks & Trailers - Trailer tires wearing inside

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View Full Version : Trailer tires wearing inside


Hollywood9s
03-03-2011, 07:19 PM
I've got a 2008 aluminum Venture roller trailer, tandem axle, with torsion suspension. Looking at it from a distance from the front, it appears that the tires/wheels are slightly bowed out at the bottom, and the inside of the tires are worn more than the middle/outside of tires.
Anyone else ever have an issue like this, or know what the problem could be?


aimless
03-03-2011, 07:20 PM
Bent axle :(

Hollywood9s
03-03-2011, 07:29 PM
Bent axle :(
All 4 wheels seem to be the same though, and wearing the same amount on the inside of all 4 tires. Trailer doesn't have many miles on it either.


tango2echo
03-03-2011, 07:42 PM
Not that uncommon and not a bent axle if all four wear the same. I have never owned a trailer that didn't wear slightly more on the inside. In some cases you can shim the hubs to do away with the wear issues. Is the weight of the boat withing the weight capacity rating of the trailer? Overloads can cause the same issue.

t2e

Hollywood9s
03-03-2011, 08:09 PM
Not that uncommon and not a bent axle if all four wear the same. I have never owned a trailer that didn't wear slightly more on the inside. In some cases you can shim the hubs to do away with the wear issues. Is the weight of the boat withing the weight capacity rating of the trailer? Overloads can cause the same issue.

t2e
Yeah, the boat is a 22' Sea Hunt CC, probably around 4,000 lbs. fully loaded, and the trailer is rated at 5'200 lbs i believe. I wondered if it might be somewhat normal. I was planing on replacing the wheels with a nice set of aluminum ones in a few months, probably replace the tires with them too.

tango2echo
03-03-2011, 08:22 PM
I'm a part owner in a 22ft Seahunt F250. I think you would be surprised at the weight. Ready to fish we are closer to 5000 than 4000.

I have had good success with Maxxis Radial trailer tires.

vettnman
03-03-2011, 09:40 PM
I'm a part owner in a 22ft Seahunt F250. I think you would be surprised at the weight. Ready to fish we are closer to 5000 than 4000.

I have had good success with Maxxis Radial trailer tires.


x2 on the maxxus tires. I had the same problem with mine and found out the culprit was the Carlyle tires that were on the trailer. Switched to maxxus and have had no problems since

billinstuart
03-04-2011, 04:54 AM
Common problem with torsion axles..the rubber torsion part has failed. Non-repairable.

Hollywood9s
03-04-2011, 04:30 PM
Common problem with torsion axles..the rubber torsion part has failed. Non-repairable.
Can you elaborate on that a bit please?

Curmudgeon
03-04-2011, 09:18 PM
I'm betting you're overloaded, but you won't know for sure until you qualify what the 5'200 means and you weigh the rig. And, no, all trailers don't wear on the inside. The chances of all four torsion rubbers failing at the same time is remote, unless you just haven't been paying any attention to the trailer whatever. I've had torsions for 7 years and haven't seen a failure yet ... ;?

billinstuart
03-05-2011, 05:06 AM
Torsion axles use a piece of rubber to hold the swinging axle stub in place and allow for "springing". This rubber wears/deteriorates with time, and allows the axle to lose its position.

Just got rid of a torsion axle on my street trailer for this very reason. Some brands seem to be better than others, but once they fail they're toast.

Overloading a torsion axle causes them to deteriorate quicker, and also causes misalignment.

There's 2 alignment issues..camber and toe. Both change with torsion axles that are failing/have failed.

Parthery
03-05-2011, 08:29 AM
Spend $7 or $8 at a truckstop and get it weighed. I'm also betting that the boat weighs more than 4000 lbs.

fish factory
03-05-2011, 08:41 AM
The biggest Venture aluminum roller trailer
listed @ their site is a "3625".
Yours a new model ?

slickster
03-05-2011, 08:43 AM
Overload....

ReelWork
03-05-2011, 08:50 AM
Really don't think you're overloaded unless your weight estimations are off.

Tires - what kind? Bias Plies have a tendency to wear unevenly... If you replace, radials are the way to go. Suspect the bushings might be shot as others have said.

Good luck!

Glock Diver
03-05-2011, 05:09 PM
My trailer and tires are doing the exact same thing! And it's frustrating as hell, cause it's a 2008 trailer that I bought used about a year ago. My I-beams are even turning in slightly.

And you probably are over the weight you think. My 22.5' center console weighs 5200 lbs with motor and a full tank of gas. And I'm within the rating of my trailer, which is the frustrating thing. I am shopping for a new one. Going to look for one with a weight rating around 7500 lbs, to give a nice margin of error.

SageBoy
03-05-2011, 05:35 PM
I have the same issue. I asked a mechanic why he thought it was happening and the first question he asked was if I made sharp radius turns with it such as backing into a driveway. That is exactly what I do at the end of the day. The way he explained it was the front tires don't rotate as easy as the back and basically when you back it in the front tires are actually dragging against the tar which is causing them to wear on the inside. I do hear and can see the tires really working when I back in. It made sense to me but having said that I wouldn't know any better based on my level of knowledge when it
comes to mechanical stuff.

tower8
03-06-2011, 07:27 AM
See if there is any play in the bearings shake the tire back and forth if it moves this is the problem.

fish factory
03-06-2011, 07:36 AM
Not to beat a dead horse,
does everyone understand most trailers
are rated in GVWR...which includes
the weight of trailer ?

Some call it "weight carrying"....same thing,
part of trailer's weight carrying is the trailer weight itself.

shoot-straight
03-08-2011, 07:33 AM
WEIGH YOUR RIG!

im not going to get into all the specifics, but i had a similar problem.

i was 1000# under weight, i weighed it several times
i had excess camber in all the wheels noted by 2 mechanics
i had bias tires, all wearing on the inside

i tried to get the "rite" company to replace the axles. they would not. wound up taking them to small claims, i won there, they appealed and i lost. they hired a lawyer and brought in a engineer. i could afford niether. needless to say, i wont be endorsing them anytime soon.

they say they are fine, but i still feel my axles have too much camber. too much camber and bias tires do not go well together. radials wear better, but do not fix the cause. i will replace my tires with radials.

many companies are not offering bias tires on torsion axles anymore. the rubber bushings allow for too much play. they are simply incompatible. its a dirty little secret.

billinstuart
03-08-2011, 08:47 AM
"Shoot" is on track. Torsion axles simply can't maintain proper alignment over time, especially when loaded to close to their rated capacity. Radial tires may be able to slightly compensate for this misalignment, but basically the axles have this design flaw that is inherent with rubber bushed axles.

Correct alignment is pretty important for tire wear..even a 1/4" misalignment on toe will cause wear.

Hollywood9s
03-08-2011, 08:48 AM
Thanks for the reponses guys.
The dry weight for my boat is 2,450 lbs, Yamaha F150 476 lbs, and i'm allowing it another 1,000 lbs for fuel, t-top, and gear. That only comes to 3,926 lbs, pretty sure it can't be too much more than that, so the trailer should be sufficient weight wise.

The trailer is a 08 Venture VATR 5225, tandem axle, roller. It's not listed on their website, but they do make bigger roller trailers than those listed on the site.
The tires are Loadstar ST205/75D14 bias ply.
All 4 tires have plenty of tread left, they are just worn more on the insides.
The trailer is 3 years old, starting the 4th season this year. I'm putting new brakes on it, and new aluminum wheels over the next few months, so maybe i will try to put radial tires on the new wheels and see if that helps any. Trailer tows great.
Does anyone think this is a safety concern?

thundra
03-08-2011, 11:05 AM
I have the same issue. I asked a mechanic why he thought it was happening and the first question he asked was if I made sharp radius turns with it such as backing into a driveway. That is exactly what I do at the end of the day. The way he explained it was the front tires don't rotate as easy as the back and basically when you back it in the front tires are actually dragging against the tar which is causing them to wear on the inside. I do hear and can see the tires really working when I back in. It made sense to me but having said that I wouldn't know any better based on my level of knowledge when it
comes to mechanical stuff.


I've been reading for years that every single inner-tire wear problem is a bent axle. Like everyone is driving around with bent axles and they get bent just that easily. Sure it is possible but cannot be all that common.

Overloading, absolutely, sure.

Vehicle tires wear every day just from being used.

I subscribe to the sharp cornering/backing up because I had tires that had about 3,000 towing miles on them and for most every ramp I would use, would have to make sharp turns either into/out of a ramp or my driveway(s). The front axle-inner tire wear was quite noticeable as they were pretty much bald, and to a lesser extent, the rear axle inner-tire wear was from all the sharp corners I had to take when loading/unloading my trailer.

No different than how we wore out the plastic front or rear wheels on our BigWheels from power braking.

shoot-straight
03-08-2011, 11:56 AM
I've been reading for years that every single inner-tire wear problem is a bent axle. Like everyone is driving around with bent axles and they get bent just that easily. Sure it is possible but cannot be all that common.

Overloading, absolutely, sure.

Vehicle tires wear every day just from being used.

I subscribe to the sharp cornering/backing up because I had tires that had about 3,000 towing miles on them and for most every ramp I would use, would have to make sharp turns either into/out of a ramp or my driveway(s). The front axle-inner tire wear was quite noticeable as they were pretty much bald, and to a lesser extent, the rear axle inner-tire wear was from all the sharp corners I had to take when loading/unloading my trailer.

No different than how we wore out the plastic front or rear wheels on our BigWheels from power braking.

i respectfully disagree. there are two sides to a tire. you cannot wear just the inside of all 4 tires by turns. the inside would wear on one side, and the outside would wear on the other. seems pretty basic to me, but perhaps i am wrong. the industry calls this "scrubbing"

thundra
03-08-2011, 12:55 PM
Shoot, I'm just going to replace my tires when they wear again.

If I get another 3,000 miles out of my current set of bias plys, I will be happy and get radials next time around.

It can't be that everyone that has inside tire wear, because I read about it all the time on all kinds of forums, has bent axles and is overloaded.

NEBassMan
03-08-2011, 04:36 PM
How about putting a level on your rims to see if they are tilted inwards as they would on an overloaded axle. Tape a couple of spacer blocks to a level at the correct locations to allow the level not to contact the tires (the spacer blocks touch the level on one sode and the rims on the other). Note the reading and move the trailer exactly 1/2 tire revolution and measure again to take out any rim dimension issue.

billinstuart
03-08-2011, 05:47 PM
i respectfully disagree. there are two sides to a tire. you cannot wear just the inside of all 4 tires by turns. the inside would wear on one side, and the outside would wear on the other. seems pretty basic to me, but perhaps i am wrong. the industry calls this "scrubbing"

Again, "shoot" dead accurate. It's a misalignment problem.

Wanna get more life out of your tires? Have them reversed on the rims.

Then, when they are worn smooth, replace the lousy torsion axles.

DoubleO7
03-09-2011, 11:43 AM
Torsion axles are built with an inherent design flaw that allows the wheels to tilt in when loaded, even when brand new.
I have no idea why they are not built with a steel insert on the axle tube end and another at the inner end of the axle shaft. With a round hole in each and a round surface on the axle shaft, the problem would be eliminated.
The rubbers inside should only be resisting the axle twist, not the load itself.

shoot-straight
03-10-2011, 06:40 AM
Torsion axles are built with an inherent design flaw that allows the wheels to tilt in when loaded, even when brand new.
I have no idea why they are not built with a steel insert on the axle tube end and another at the inner end of the axle shaft. With a round hole in each and a round surface on the axle shaft, the problem would be eliminated.
The rubbers inside should only be resisting the axle twist, not the load itself.

exactly my point. well said.

dadriva
05-15-2011, 12:48 PM
I have a tri axle torsion bar trailer that is having this issue but only all of the sudden.

We towed the boat to FL last fall and I noticed that the inside of all 6 bias ply tires were well worn. I noted this and had them removed from the rim and placed on the opposite side to put the fresh rubber on the inside. We left FL for OH and got 230 miles down the road and I noticed at a fuel stop that the insides (with fresh tread at the beginning of this trip) were almost bald.
This was a big problem as it was 5pm on a friday in Brunswick, GA. We considered new radial tires but I was informed that only bias plys are available in the size range that are currently installed (217/75C14) We ended up trailering (slowly!) back to Tampa and airlining home as I have to be back at work tomorrow.

It was a bit of a clusterf**k but we are safe and sound. I have a 3 year warranty on the trailer and am going to call them tomorrow. If that is to no avail I am going to have a new trailer built **sigh**

The GVWR is 11000 lbs and the carrying cap. is 9000lbs. Trailer has ~7000 miles on it.

The axles are 5 lug 3500lb axles so I do not know where the manufacturer is getting 11000 lbs from as 3500x3 = 10500

I've had it weighed and it was 10600lbs with 1/2 fuel in the boat. The dealer sold me this trailer with the boat and touted it as "built for the boat" so I did not scrutinize the capacities and was perhaps a bit too trusting.

Anyone have any insight as to causes, fixes, etc???...HELP!!!

BLUE DOLPHIN
05-15-2011, 12:58 PM
Some axles are built with no camber unloaded that when loaded or overloaded become negative, others are built intentionally with positive camber unloaded that become neutral with loading. An alignment shop can check this and correct it if needed by inducing positive camber by bending the center of the axle with the ends chained down. I would never buy a new axle without asking the question. As to the above post another issue to consider is the load capacity of your tires and the inflation pressure, I always tow with the tires inflated to max pressure.You could have 5k axles and 4k of load capacity on your tires. And lastly weigh your rig, the dealer or manufacturers estimates can be way off affecting all of the other calculations.

tampagrouper
05-31-2011, 01:38 PM
The OP is referring to the max capacity of the trailer fully loaded. Is it possible the trailer builder should have put a heavier duty axle under this trailer? This what I suspect! I suspect many builders are the same way. When I had owens and sons build my trailer, it only needed two 3500k axles. I requested to have two 5k axles instead. It cost a little more but Im not buying tires every two years. I have torsen axles, two of them and have never had inner tire wear. just my .02

Hollywood9s
05-31-2011, 02:43 PM
I examined my trailer tires closer a few weeks after starting this thread, and upon closer inspection they were not worn nearly as much as i had originally thought. They had slightly more wear on the inside, but it was minimal, and they still have plenty of tread.
I replaced my factory galvanized wheels with aluminum wheels and ended up replacing the 2 front tires on the trailer, and will probably replace the other 2 next year. I could have easily gotten a few more years out of them, but they probably would have started showing signs of dryrot before the tread was low enough to replace them anyway.



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