The Boating Forum - How much chain do I need for my anchor?

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FireFly
02-26-2011, 04:40 PM
I have a 23' walk around and use a danforth anchor - how many feet and what diameter chain do I need?

thx


Wrangler of Space
02-26-2011, 05:06 PM
You shouldn't require any more than 10-15 feet, then you want about 4 times the deepest water for overall length. At a 5:1 ratio (length to depth) the chain will help keep the ground tackle on the bottom and the length of rope will act as a shock absorber. As for chain 1/4" is fine. With the rope, you can go cheaper, with 3 strand nylon, but it won't handle very well (pay out or coil) once it gets salty. If you get an expensive 8 plait, you can just stow it and forget it, it lays well, and won't get stiff in the locker...

Jack Hart
02-26-2011, 05:10 PM
How much chain you need depends on where and how you anchor. If you anchor in shallow water on sandy bottoms, in non-challenging situations, you could probably get away with no chain. For your type of boat, the usual recommendation is 6 feet of 3/16 chain. If you anchor in deep water over rocky bottoms with lots of wind and in rough water, 20 feet of 1/4 chain might not be out of the question.

In general, the more chain, the better your anchor will hold for any give length of anchor rode. OTOH, more chain means more weight, more difficult anchor handling, more storage requirements, and more expense.


Doug in Bermuda
02-26-2011, 05:13 PM
Simple rule should do you. Boat length +/- a little.

Cuzmondo
02-26-2011, 05:31 PM
Simple rule should do you. Boat length +/- a little.

Yep, what he said. I have a 21' boat and 25' of chain. 9# danforth anchor and never have a problem holding. My boat has a pretty small anchor locker so I can only hold about 300' of 1/2" nylon 3-strand, so this set up works great for me. I can anchor in 120' of water with about 250' of line out. But it depends on our bottom; everything and everywhere I anchor is sandy bottom.

TSA
02-26-2011, 05:35 PM
yep^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

...........unless you don't have a windlass. then 15ft and an anchor ball.

Reel 007
02-26-2011, 05:55 PM
The Coast Guard boating safety class I took recommended twice the boat length, 1/4 should be fine for a 23' boat.

Absolute
02-26-2011, 06:16 PM
Simple rule should do you. Boat length +/- a little.

x2

TSA
02-26-2011, 06:34 PM
The Coast Guard boating safety class I took recommended twice the boat length, 1/4 should be fine for a 23' boat.

for blow boaters maybe, for power boaters........not practical.

Reel 007
02-26-2011, 06:53 PM
for blow boaters maybe, for power boaters........not practical.


I have a 28' power boat with 75' of chain and it work just fine, as a matter of fact I use a 22lbs anchor and find I can get away with a little less rode.and I am anchoring over night around the Islands here in Southern California. most practical.

PS, I am using a Lufron windlass recommended for boats 30-40'

shoreboatin
02-26-2011, 06:54 PM
Agreed TSA I have a 186 laguna and the locker in my boat and most others that I've seen could never hold twice the boat lenght in chain along with hundreds of feet of rope. Ten feet of 1/4 works great for me but I will add that I always have extra rope in a water tight bag so if I ever need a little extra rode I'm ready

StraitsFisher
02-26-2011, 07:02 PM
Maybe I'm tired, but why is this a question?

Read Chapman's, go to West Marine, do a search.....all roads lead to something around the length of your boat.

It's not about practicality, it's about safety. Whether at a lunch stop or an over-night stop.

Learn how to select, set, and pull an anchor.

Rant over. I have a 23' pilot house. I use a plow anchor, 30' of chain, and 300' of rode. That's the rig I use 100% of the time. I have a redundant set-up with a mooring ball that I take on trips so I don't have to pull the anchor every morning. I have that rig on the boat. And today I was in the shop and realized I have two extra set-ups.

Maybe I'm OCD about it....

Curmudgeon
02-26-2011, 09:50 PM
The Coast Guard boating safety class I took recommended twice the boat length ...

46' of chain in a 23'er? Someone at the Coast Guard needs a reality check ... ;?

jpw64
02-26-2011, 09:56 PM
What is rode?

stumprunner
02-26-2011, 10:34 PM
Don't want to hijack thread, but have anchor rope question. I have always used 3/8" platted rope on my last two 25' boats with no problem. New boat (32') came with box full of 5/8" rope. Hard as hell to set anchor because rope wants to float alot due to large diameter. I could add more chain and steel anchor instead of Fortress, but really do not want to. Was wondering if anyone has used 3/8" 8 ply rope on 30ish foot boat? I have hung anchor on all boat with 3/8" rope, had to work hard to break it! The 3/8 rope is easier to handle, cheaper, takes up less room, and goes down easy. I guess I could buy some of that 1/4" AmSTEEL Blue Dyneema Rope. It has higher working load rating than 1/2" nylon.

tprice
02-27-2011, 02:25 AM
Simple rule should do you. Boat length +/- a little.


Yep:thumbsup:

rat_catcher
02-27-2011, 03:09 AM
What is rode?

The proper nautical name for the rope/chain that connects the anchor to the boat.

ThreeLittleFish
02-27-2011, 03:15 AM
You can get away with 1/2 the boat length for day anchoring only in calm water with a scope of 10:1.

For day/night anchoring the length of the boat is sufficient with a scope of 15:1 if possible for overnight anchoring.

cts510
02-27-2011, 04:27 AM
I have a 23 WA which came with 10 feet of chain. This must have been a joke. It would hook up in calm water but never in the River. Upgraded to 25 feet and never had a problem.

Boat length +/- works well for me.

busanga
02-27-2011, 04:38 AM
is there any way to join rode together when using a windlass. ??

Justin_NJ
02-27-2011, 04:52 AM
The Coast Guard boating safety class I took recommended twice the boat length, 1/4 should be fine for a 23' boat.


Kind of overkill unless you are really planning to spend the night or leave the boat on the hook in an area that can get be snotty or you anchor in areas often with rocky or rough bottoms that can tear up the line used for the rest of your rode.


Most recreational boaters do fine with about a boat length. Many sandy or mud bottom bay boaters do fine with the old rule of thumb of 6 feet of chain.

I run 30 feet on my 32 foot boat and have never pulled anchor after switching to a Delta. Anchor type for your sea bottom is very important!

rwidman
02-27-2011, 05:32 AM
Don't want to hijack thread, but have anchor rope question. I have always used 3/8" platted rope on my last two 25' boats with no problem. New boat (32') came with box full of 5/8" rope. Hard as hell to set anchor because rope wants to float alot due to large diameter. I could add more chain and steel anchor instead of Fortress, but really do not want to. Was wondering if anyone has used 3/8" 8 ply rope on 30ish foot boat? I have hung anchor on all boat with 3/8" rope, had to work hard to break it! The 3/8 rope is easier to handle, cheaper, takes up less room, and goes down easy. I guess I could buy some of that 1/4" AmSTEEL Blue Dyneema Rope. It has higher working load rating than 1/2" nylon.
Nylon is what you should be using for anchor rode. It does not float. You should be using 1/2", 9/16", or 5/8" nylon line for your rode. In addition to not floating, nylon stretches which reduces shock on the anchor and your boat cleats.

rwidman
02-27-2011, 05:33 AM
Simple rule should do you. Boat length +/- a little.

I agree.:thumbsup:

diveboss
02-27-2011, 06:00 AM
What is rode?

Not to bash anyone, but I am a big proponent of boating classes! :trout:

dhy4b
02-27-2011, 06:04 AM
On my 24', I've got 25 ft of chain. When anchoring in deeper water with larger seas, I couldn't get the anchor to hold without it.

I have a Lewmar windlass to pull it all back up

Mark2
02-27-2011, 07:42 AM
My boat is 24' and fairly heavy. I also anchor in heavy current in the Columbia river. I have 12' of 3/8" stainless chain and 300' of rode to a stainless rocking chair style anchor and I have never slipped.

805gregg
02-27-2011, 08:08 AM
for blow boaters maybe, for power boaters........not practical.

Why? I have 250' ft of chain on my boat.

tango2echo
02-27-2011, 08:22 AM
I have a 17lb Danforth style anchor that has been cut to fit my anchor locker, 20ft of 3/8th chain, and 600ft of 1/2" nylon 8 platt rode on my 20ft boat. I regularly anchor in 120-140ft and having the heavy rig really helps. Yes it is overkill. I could get by with 400ft of rode and 10ft of chain with a smaller anchor.

And yes it all will fit in the locker if carefully coiled. It is also a hoot to watch newbs pull the anchor in from 120ft.

t2e

Absolute
02-27-2011, 08:52 AM
What is rode?

Rope is what we buy, then we bring it on board. Once we put it to use on a vessel it takes on a new name, rope used for anchoring is rode.

Each rope has a specific task and name once put in to use on a vessel....

Absolute
02-27-2011, 09:08 AM
The reason for chain is to provide a catenary effect on a resting anchor.

We carry two 45 lb. anchors on the bow (one plow, one claw) and an emergency 18 lb. danforth on the stern. All three have chain - the two bow anchors have 250' of 5/16" with 200' of nylon rode each and the danforth has 25 ft of 1/4" chain with 100 feet of rode.


The best anchor to have is one that will allow you to sleep throught the night, don't skimp on safety gear.

Mist-Rest
02-27-2011, 09:48 AM
If I was in a tidal area I would have a lot of chain. I'm not and 6 to 10 feet works just fine.

There is no "one answer fits all" to the question.

Justin_NJ
02-27-2011, 09:56 AM
Rope is what we buy, then we bring it on board. Once we put it to use on a vessel it takes on a new name, rope used for anchoring is rode.

Each rope has a specific task and name once put in to use on a vessel....


Technically the rode is chain, line or a combination of chain and line. In the case of most of our boats we are using a combination of chain and line to make the anchor rode.

Rope becomes line when you put it on the boat, and it then becomes rode or part of the rode (when connected to chain) when attached to an anchor.

Don't spam me for the above information, I just re-read it in Chapman's book to make sure I wasn't thinking the same as you were.

Absolute
02-27-2011, 10:03 AM
Good old Chapman's, they assured us we would loose 80% of what we learned when we took the test.

FireFly
02-27-2011, 04:50 PM
Man....suggestions of 6' to 46' of chain :)

I've been using ~12' of chain which is way too stout (and heavy) and I want to do it right this year. Thanks for the suggestions - I'll go with between 15 and 20' of chain. I usually anchor in 15' of water and a sandy bottom when we hit the beach with an occasional anchorage up river in 30' with a decent current, and never overnight.

Nickers52
02-21-2013, 02:07 PM
You guys (and apparently the CG too) crack me up! The only thing the length of the boat has to do with it is how far away it is from the floor where you want to stay.

Justin_NJ
02-21-2013, 06:08 PM
You guys (and apparently the CG too) crack me up! The only thing the length of the boat has to do with it is how far away it is from the floor where you want to stay.


WHAT? oh, sorry, just realized it was your first post!

thataway
02-22-2013, 08:24 AM
How to join or extend an anchor rode?

Chain: there are connector links. Put J B Weld between the surfaces and peen over the nipples.

3 strand? Do a long splice. Braid or plait...can be done, look up end to end splice.

Rico2
02-22-2013, 08:34 AM
Whats an anchor? :trout:

I just have a big metal fish hook on the bow. I was told its for catching "the big one". :sleeping:

Eyehooker
02-22-2013, 08:43 AM
I fish not far from you in Lake Erie -Conneaut OH we usually anchor in 70 ft of water -- boat is Steigercraft 23 Pilot house--- I used 200 ft with 10ft of chain w Danforth--- used to use Ball recently changed to windlass for 2 reasons 1. Age 70+ 2. PH hard to get to bow in 2-4 fters--- I love the windlass--- tip get a Good windlass--- Don't have t o cleat down-- if you don't cleat down will ruin freefall -- plus accidental drop NOT GOOD!!!!--- if you are young and can get to bow easy Lewmar etc ok but must cleat down !!!

freddy063
02-22-2013, 05:10 PM
I was asking if you got you answer yet to this post,

Wellcraft Coastal 232
02-24-2013, 06:25 PM
On my 24', I've got 25 ft of chain. When anchoring in deeper water with larger seas, I couldn't get the anchor to hold without it.

I have a Lewmar windlass to pull it all back up

When guys on the water shout over to me when I'm using my windlass to retrieve my anchor...I call it "the marriage saver".

And every guy on the water without one smiles or laughs and says I have to get me one of those.

Good for everyone temperament on board...never seen anyone regret one once they have one!

My extra 2 Cents for this thread... ;)

Nickers52
03-02-2013, 11:24 AM
WHAT? oh, sorry, just realized it was your first post!

What WHAT? Are you just being a smart ass? Are you trying to slap me down so I don't ever post again? or perhaps trying to get me to post 2500 more times so I can be as smart as you? Do you not understand what I am saying? What do you mean by WHAT? What is your question or problem? Do you see somebody new and have to make yourself known to them right away to estabish your superiority? Or do you really mean "what?" because you don't understand my English? Let me explain it a different way.
Several people here have tried to use simple rules saying that the length of the rode should be the length of the boat or twice the length of the boat. But, it is not a matter of the length of the boat. A two hundred foot boat does not need 400 feet or even 200 feet of rode if it is never in water over 100 feet deep, nor will a 25 foot boat be able to drop anchor with 25 or even 50 feet of rode if those 25 feet of boat are 100 feet above the floor.
From now on I will just keep my opinions to myself.

Stopping at two posts.

Justin_NJ
03-03-2013, 09:37 AM
What WHAT? Are you just being a smart ass? Are you trying to slap me down so I don't ever post again? or perhaps trying to get me to post 2500 more times so I can be as smart as you? Do you not understand what I am saying? What do you mean by WHAT? What is your question or problem? Do you see somebody new and have to make yourself known to them right away to estabish your superiority? Or do you really mean "what?" because you don't understand my English? Let me explain it a different way.
Several people here have tried to use simple rules saying that the length of the rode should be the length of the boat or twice the length of the boat. But, it is not a matter of the length of the boat. A two hundred foot boat does not need 400 feet or even 200 feet of rode if it is never in water over 100 feet deep, nor will a 25 foot boat be able to drop anchor with 25 or even 50 feet of rode if those 25 feet of boat are 100 feet above the floor.
From now on I will just keep my opinions to myself.

Stopping at two posts.


The 'what' was because I honestly didn't understand what you were trying to say. The part about cranking on us and the coast guard was why I responded the way I did.

If you also had read through the thread, you may have realized the question was how much chain was required as part of the anchor rode, not the entire length of anchor road needed for a specific size boat.

The issue here is safety to ensure that there is enough chain on the anchor to hold the anchor shank flat against the seafloor. The longer the boat and more so the weight of the boat will help a boat owner how much chain should be used on their anchor rode.

This thread, while it was brought up, isn't really about how much total anchor rode a specific size boat would need.

And btw - your reference to a 200 foot boat doesn't need 400, or even 200 feet of anchor rode if it's never in more than 100 feet of water does have somewhat of a valid point - if that 200 foot boat never sees water over 28 feet from the seafloor to the anchor rode payout point of the boat, then no, it would may need more than 200 feet of anchor rode. However, if that 200 foot boat spends it's life in a swift current, then the captain may choose to hold an anchor line capable of a 10 to 1 or even 12 to 1 scope in the depest water the boat typically sees!



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