Northeast - Tuna Tackle Budget

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crdavis61
02-10-2010, 06:33 AM
I just moved to Scituate MA and everyone says " If you live in Scituate, you gotta get a boat", including my wife! So I am beginning to shop around a little for a boat, but was wondering how much should I budget for tuna tackle $3K, $5K, $7K, more?. I just want enough good tackle to get started. I am relativley new to the sport and have alot to learn!

Anyone going to the MBG Fishing Seminar on March 6th? I can't wait!

This is my first post on this forum and thanks in advance for any suggestions you can give me.


Simonsez
02-10-2010, 10:12 AM
If you are like the rest of us, you will not, sleep, eat, work, etc without TUNA on the brain once you hook up, That being said, plan on 10k plus for setting up a new boat! This is a sickness, you have been warned! LOL
kevin

Locke N Load
02-10-2010, 11:04 AM
Do not make the mistake of buying less expensive gear. It will do nothing but blow up and then you will have to go out and buy the good stuff. That being said, you do not need to go out and get 4 130s, 6 80s and 8 50s either. Alot will depend on what type of boat you get and the type of fishing you want to do. Trolling, livelining, chunking, jigging, casting or any combination of each.
The good thing is if you buy the good stuff and change your mind you can get a lot of your investment back.


CornerOffice
02-10-2010, 11:58 AM
Tuna and Budget - hahahaha!!!
Attend the seminars, hire a captin/charter next year and by 2011 you will know what you need.

crdavis61
02-10-2010, 01:21 PM
Thanks guys! I told my wife this was gonna get expensive!

GOODNYOU
02-10-2010, 05:09 PM
Hey chuck,

I guess you can blame me.Tell Kelly its my fault. You know what you need out east but I bet you need a little more variety in the bay. Not really my area so Im not sure. A couple of casting setups,and jigging rods in addition to 4 50 wides and something big like an 80 to run the planer deep.

Chris

crdavis61
02-10-2010, 06:32 PM
Hey Dude! Thanks man, and yes, you got me hooked! Hey, I have some good news. That little item that got lost in the mail turned up at my house a few days ago. I will give it to you when I see you in a couple of weeks.

LI32
02-11-2010, 05:05 AM
You don't say how big of a boat you are getting, so what you need and even what you'd like ot have may vary. If you only have range to target school Bluefin, your budget will be a lot smaller than if you are planning to go after giants or yellowfin/big eye in the canyons. Another factor, which goes along with boat size is how versatile is your gear.
My gear is pretty much single purpose - Ive got a set of 5 Penn Internationals for sharking, another set of 11 for Offshore trolling + 6 for chunking, and 4 Penn Torques for tuna jigging (all with rods). You will also need tackle, everything from a large assortment of trolling bars, lures, hoo rigs to jigs and chunking hooks to gaffs and enough bags to store all that stuff neatly. My Offshore tackle consists of 20+ spreader bars, 100+ other lures, 30+ hoo-heads, 100+ hooks with leaders for shark, tuna, swordfish, tilefish, squid and some other general stuff. For landing equipment, 4 belt/harness combos, 2 flying gaffs, 1 harpoon with 3 darts, 4 fixed gaffs (2-5" + 2-3"), ARC dehookers, bait & landing nets. I've got about $22k in rods/reels, $2k in landing gear, and another $5k in tackle.
For Tuna, I would think to start out with maybe 7 trolling/chunking outfits outfits (3-50w's + 2-30w's + 2 16's) of good quality (Penn Internationals and all roller guide rods) and 2 jigging outfits (Penn Torque 200's and matching Torque rods) and an ultra basic set of lures (4 bars, 4 chains, 4 machines, 2 macines with birds, 4 hoo-hoods, 4 tuna feathers, 2 large and 2 small jets - all in green, green/yellow or rainbow) plus 3 dozen live bait hooks (6/0-8/0 on 40-80lb flouro leaders and 150 lb ballbearing swivels). All of that will cost about $7k.

Parapapam
02-11-2010, 05:19 AM
Guys,

All your suggestions are fantastic if you can afford them. But you don't "need" all that stuff. Admittedly you very quickly will "want" all that gear, but it is not required to get started.

I would spend my money in the following order:

1. Go with a guide a few times.

2. Get the boat

3. Get all the safety gear

4. I would suggest 4 used Penn 50's (will last forever and have good resale value) , 4 - 11 inch FO spreader bars (About as inexpensive as any quality bar out there), 4 Ilanders to rig in front of ballyhoos (you will need to learn to rig 'hoo, so get started), a gaff a pair of gloves (you will hook up sooner or later and you will want to land it), a huge cooler to put the fish in.... oh ya, make sure you get the HMSP permit. The total price for this tackle is about $2.5k to $3k.

5. Then I would fish 10 times and see what else you "need." The total price of what you will convince yourself you will need is unlimited.

6. Win the lottery, then buy everything list in the previous posts twice...

Start with the basics and then fish a ton. You will quickly figure out what else to buy.

Mike

On The Edge 1
02-11-2010, 06:25 AM
Mike hit it spot on. How many of us actually went out and spent 10 grand + all at once to get set up to go tuna fishing. If you have that kind of $$ great but most dont.

I for one did not. There was a smaller upfront investment and then a slow build up in gear and equipment. I think the only thing i can add to Mikes comments is to pick up, or make up a good rigging kit including crimps and cutters, beads, chaff gear, various crimps for the line sizes you wil be using, and the hardware you will be using. This is a absolute must for tuna fishing. In the spring/early summer you will find the bass and blues mixed in with the tuna on the tuna grounds and they will tear up your rigs. Being able to repair/re rig a bar, chain or single bait rig on the water yourself is invaluable. If your rigs get tore up in the first few hours and you can not repair or replace them you are done for the day.

Stew at The Hook Up has a good kit allready put together that will more then get you going. I think it is even available on his online store. He should also have some the the Worc show this weekend.

crdavis61
02-11-2010, 06:47 AM
I really appreciate the input and am begining to understand that Tuna Fishing and Budget do not really get along very well!

mr buck
02-11-2010, 07:44 AM
Yea, sounds like attending the seminar, talking to the presenters, and going on a guided trip might be the best route....

fattuna
02-11-2010, 08:11 AM
First Light Anglers in Rowley, Mass. is the place to get all the information you need regarding bluefin tuna fishing. While never looking to push a product or upsell, they are constantly looking to fit anglers according to specific needs.

Not an employee, just a fan

bjm9818
02-11-2010, 08:48 AM
When I was living in Charlestown MA, I purchased a bunch of stuff from John White at Fishermans Outfitter in Gloucester. Neat little shop and his custom made rods are great. I think to be realistic, I would purchase a few rod/reel sets and the basic tackle to get you on the water the first year. Find out what type of tuna fishing you plan/like to do and go from there. If you drop $15K before you even start you might just be waisting your money. Buy good gear that will last a lifetime, no cheap crap.

If you find you do plan to be a avid tuna fisherman, plan on spending $15K in a very short time to start. I think I have a single 3700 plano box that has almost a grand worth of swivels/connectors and terminal tackle....WTF was I thinking..... As Simonsez said it can very easily become a problem!!!!!!

RD1234
02-11-2010, 12:33 PM
Your question on tackle becomes a little more complicated because the tuna on stellwagon have been changing in size quite a bit over the last few years. 2007 mostly 45-53" fish. 2008 55-65" fish. 2009 64-70" fish. Tackle would be a much easier question if the fish year in year out were pretty much always the same size. What I mentioned above in 2007, 2008 and 2009 one could easily conclude that the fish in 2010 are going to be 67-75" and you should gear for that size fish. But each year is different so that might not be the case. The bigger fish could move on and we'll be back to 45-52" fish. Time will tell.

Like the guys said I'd plan on aquiring gear over time little by little unless you just have cash to burn. In my opinion 50's are a good starting point for trolling/live baiting. A little over kill on 50" fish but can handle 75" fish. I'm the wrong guy to ask about casting/jigging gear.

I fish 2 bars exclusivley. Same 2 bars. Only thing is I had to go through 10 bars to find the 2 that work for me 95% of the time. So I have 8 bars that sit on the boat or in the basement that rarely get wet. Welcome to tuna fishing.

Another thing to keep in mind before you go out and purchase a bunch of new gear is the CITES issue. If CITES goes through in March there is a chance none of us will be tuna fishing in 2010 and you'll have wasted a bunch of money you could have spent on some nice striper gear.

Legal Bill
02-16-2010, 07:54 AM
I invested in two jigging rods and reels and a selection of jigs. I've spent about $500. I'm very cautious. :lol:

ffiisshh0
02-16-2010, 02:53 PM
It depends on your budget. If your watching your $$, id start with 2 50's and 2 30's setups. 2 casting setups, conventional or spinning, whatever you like. Terminal Liveline setups, flouro 60,80, 120, wire, swivels, hooks. 2to4 spreaderbars, 2to4 X-Raps, rigged sluggos/shankas/hoagies in white & pink. You can buy the rods/reels for short money used online, or buy new and custome rods, anywhere inbtween. A couple 6' gaffs, butterfly jigs, sabikis, maybe a poon, fishbag, cooler. ALL that could be had for about $2500. Or 1 custom 30 could be 2400.00 it all depends on your own budget. That gear above will work 9 times out of 10, either live baiting or trolling.

LI32
02-16-2010, 04:57 PM
I invested in two jigging rods and reels and a selection of jigs. I've spent about $500. I'm very cautious. :lol:

That is only worthwhile if you are going close by for BFT. Every trip I make to Hudson Canyon runs me 220-270 gallons of fuel, ice and bait - well more than $1,000. I can't see spending that kind of coin, and cutting my options (and thus chances of catching fish), to jigging with two rods just because I wanted to keep my tackle outlay to $500.

BACKTOTHESEA
02-17-2010, 05:30 AM
considering you are new to the area and apparently new to tuna fishing, I would first advise doing a charter or two on a craft similar to what you are going to buy. doing a charter on a 45 footer with 12 line spread and huge cockpit with a mate and seasoned captain is a bit different than the experience in a 26' CC where you may tend to hunt for the fish a bit more. Second, let experience dictate your needs and budget. You may find the experience of finding the fish and casting or jigging more rewarding than towing a spread with the herd off the SW corner. Learning to find fish and correlate locations with tides, moon phase, water temperature and bait types will result in the most gratifying experience, at least to me.

This being said, many have suggested some good ideas. I personally would also start with at least 2 decent jigging setups and 2 casting setups and focus on finding fish. These can also double as cod gear to put meat in the cooler when the conditions are not optimal for tuna (like the stage of the tide). You can also slow troll some sluggos with the same gear if need be. I have watched some older gentlemen doing this with great success with smaller fish that still provide a fun experience. On the higher end, you are looking at around $600 for a very capable rod mated with something like a Finor, spheros or Penn. Personally I would get some decent quality here especially knowing the size fish you may encounter.

for trolling, a 5 rod spread to start is very easy to manage and gives you a realistic shot at some nice fish. assuming you are not going the highly custom route, you can look at spending from around $400 for a single speed conventional reel with braid and 50 to 80 rod with roller tip to around a grand for an all roller 100# class rod with braid and 50 wides. As some have stated, the fish that have been showing grow larger and larger every year and a 30 wide in the hands of an inexperienced crew may be a bit undergunned. A 50 wide or larger conventional will probably suit your needs better. Add another grand or so for a couple gaffs, 2 harnesses, a plate, some leader, swivels, hooks, crimper and crimps and other misc gear. I think close to 8 to 10k if going all new with pretty nice gear will set you up with the above, and closer to 5k if shopping used on the high cost items (especially trolling reels).

Fishermens Outfitter in Glouster, MA has served me well on bars and other misc terminal gear.

ffiisshh0
02-18-2010, 01:33 AM
I believe he is looking strictly at CapeCod Bay and school BF out of Scituate, so the canyon gear is irrelevent, and whole nother ballgame ! A 30 filled with spectra and topshot hold 500+ yards and can deliver 40+ lbs of drag, more than adequate for school tuna and and occassional 300+ or big shark. Its much more user friendly and comfortable when fiting fish. I go out of Scituate alot, more than welcome to jump on for a trip and learn the ropes. Sounds like its not your first rodeo if youve fished out of Chatham? There are some differences for sure!

crdavis61
02-18-2010, 06:19 AM
Man! Thanks for all the information. I really appreciate it. I keep reading each entry 2-3 times to make sure I did not miss anything. I have fished with another THT member off the Cape (close to Chatham) a few times last year and we caught fish almost everytime we went---that is how I got TUNA FEVER! Thanks Chris! We were in a 26 foot boat, which is the size I am looking for.

Looks like there are many options for sure and I could get enough decent gear for about $4-5K to start and build from there. This would at least get me out there trolling, casting and jigging.

Hey ffiisshh0 - I just might take you up on your offer. I live about a mile from the harbor.

Legal Bill
02-18-2010, 09:23 AM
That is only worthwhile if you are going close by for BFT. Every trip I make to Hudson Canyon runs me 220-270 gallons of fuel, ice and bait - well more than $1,000. I can't see spending that kind of coin, and cutting my options (and thus chances of catching fish), to jigging with two rods just because I wanted to keep my tackle outlay to $500.

I agree. My plan is to get at least a couple of trolling rods to go with the jigging rods. The trouble is, it is a real slippery slope and so easy to talk yourself into buying 10 rods and reels, etc for tuna. I'm thinking a couple of 50s would give me what I need for most situations.

Hepatitis Sea
02-18-2010, 09:59 AM
It can be done with smaller gear if you don't want to break the bank. The first year I tuna fished all I ran were TLD25s on used stand up rods that I got dirt cheap. No outriggers. Nada. And we caught fish. Yeah, you run the risk of hooking a monster that will dump you but there's no reason you can't start small and gradually move up. That's what I did...

ffiisshh0
02-18-2010, 03:22 PM
caught on Accurate 30 this year on the Bank. 400+

RD1234
02-18-2010, 06:09 PM
It can be done with smaller gear if you don't want to break the bank. The first year I tuna fished all I ran were TLD25s on used stand up rods that I got dirt cheap. No outriggers. Nada. And we caught fish. Yeah, you run the risk of hooking a monster that will dump you but there's no reason you can't start small and gradually move up. That's what I did...

Agree 100%. In 2007 when the majority of the fish were 47-52" we loved fishing the TLD 25. We'd hook one that size on a 50 and after a TLD 25 and think this isn't much fun on a 50. Then we hooked a 62" on a TLD 25. Got the fish but realized the fish definitely had the advantage. Then 2008 came along and we pulled out the 30's and 50's. I try to match the gear to the fish best possible. I've been lucky enough to aquire all the different sized gear over the years. 65-70" (175-200lb) fish on a tld 25 going to be tough fish in and fish out. Like I said love them on 45-55" fish. Just depends on what the majority of the fish around are. If there are 400lbers in the mix the big gear is coming out.

crdavis61
02-19-2010, 04:45 AM
I guess I can look at all the different gear at the upcoming NE Boat Show and Seminars too, but

if we keep buying furniture and stuff for house, the fishing budget is going to get busted. HAHA!

Nice catch ffisshh0!

CB Haws
02-19-2010, 07:24 AM
I started with Penn 114 H's (6/0's) loaded with 80 pound test. You can pick them up for way less then a 100 bucks used. I did buy Penn Tuna sticks. The rods cost more then the reels!! Now those rods carry Penn 50T's and 30T's. When a rod gives up the ghost (breaks) I take over the Kevin Bogan and get him to build me a Custom Bogan Rod using the old Aftco parts. Take care of what ever you buy and it can last a lifetime. Unless it is that Japanese/Chinese stuff. Shimano has a bad habit of discontinuing reels and that stops the replacement parts cold. Got burned once by them they will never get the chance to do that to me again. Just saying

amarshall
02-19-2010, 09:58 AM
Save yourself a ton of money.. lose the wife :grin:

Legal Bill
02-19-2010, 11:46 AM
So for the first two conventional (trolling) reels, would you get 25s, 30s or 50s?

To the OP, sorry for hijacking your thread, but at least we are on the same topic.

Legal Bill
02-19-2010, 11:50 AM
I started with Penn 114 H's (6/0's) loaded with 80 pound test. You can pick them up for way less then a 100 bucks used. I did buy Penn Tuna sticks. The rods cost more then the reels!! Now those rods carry Penn 50T's and 30T's. When a rod gives up the ghost (breaks) I take over the Kevin Bogan and get him to build me a Custom Bogan Rod using the old Aftco parts. Take care of what ever you buy and it can last a lifetime. Unless it is that Japanese/Chinese stuff. Shimano has a bad habit of discontinuing reels and that stops the replacement parts cold. Got burned once by them they will never get the chance to do that to me again. Just saying

Thanks for tip, CB. I took a look at a new 114 the other day and thought it just didn't look as good as the older ones. did they start making thse in China or something? My nine year old 113s are great, but I know they don't have the guts for tuna.

iguana
02-19-2010, 11:53 AM
I would say you can't go wrong with a set of 4 50s backed with Spectra on decent stand up rods. Shimano, Avet then Penn would be my preference. This is all you can pull from a 26' anyway and will work for troll, bait, etc. Figure 800-1000 per set up.

CB Haws
02-19-2010, 12:21 PM
Several years ago I boated a 87 pound bluefin on a 113 (4/0) with 50 pound yellow stren. Yes it almost spooled me twice and my buddy had water coming over the transom backing down, in my 28Bertram; but we got it in the boat. The Canyon Runner kept circling us to see what we hooked up. A couple of times too close; and I yelled at them over the VHF. They hooked up a nice big wahoo in the same area a few minutes later.
That was also the day a huge thunder storm line blew through with 70 mph or higher winds. No report on the VHF weather channel when I looked west and did not like what I saw. So we made a fast run home. My buddy crying about leaving a hot spot most of the way. On the way in we passed a small boat with what looked like a father/son on board about 20 miles out. At that time they were broadcasting on the VHF weather channels about the line; but not on 16 yet. I tried to raise the guys on VHF. At the time it was beautiful sunny day with little wind. Guess they had their VHF off; but it was black looking west. As we approached Manasquan Inlet we were slamming through a 6-8 foot following sea. Wind was being sucked into the line as it moved east. We blew past an old 45 Hat FamilyTides I believe. He called me on the VHF to say he and his fares had been watching us running. They could not see a boat just huge explosions of water as we slammed through the backside of the rollers. He told his fares it has to be a Bertram. We just made the inlet when all hell broke loose. The wind shifted 180 degrees I had a really hard time keeping the boat pointed into the wind. Well channel 16 on the VHF came alive with distress calls. People were screaming over each other. One smaller boat was lost in the area a that day with a father and son on board. I always wondered if that was the boat we passed on the clear sunny day?

Be careful out there and keep the radios on.

WhizOff
02-19-2010, 06:36 PM
Have you caught a fish yet?

WhizOff
02-19-2010, 06:48 PM
You don't say how big of a boat you are getting, so what you need and even what you'd like ot have may vary. If you only have range to target school Bluefin, your budget will be a lot smaller than if you are planning to go after giants or yellowfin/big eye in the canyons. Another factor, which goes along with boat size is how versatile is your gear.
My gear is pretty much single purpose - Ive got a set of 5 Penn Internationals for sharking, another set of 11 for Offshore trolling + 6 for chunking, and 4 Penn Torques for tuna jigging (all with rods). You will also need tackle, everything from a large assortment of trolling bars, lures, hoo rigs to jigs and chunking hooks to gaffs and enough bags to store all that stuff neatly. My Offshore tackle consists of 20+ spreader bars, 100+ other lures, 30+ hoo-heads, 100+ hooks with leaders for shark, tuna, swordfish, tilefish, squid and some other general stuff. For landing equipment, 4 belt/harness combos, 2 flying gaffs, 1 harpoon with 3 darts, 4 fixed gaffs (2-5" + 2-3"), ARC dehookers, bait & landing nets. I've got about $22k in rods/reels, $2k in landing gear, and another $5k in tackle.
For Tuna, I would think to start out with maybe 7 trolling/chunking outfits outfits (3-50w's + 2-30w's + 2 16's) of good quality (Penn Internationals and all roller guide rods) and 2 jigging outfits (Penn Torque 200's and matching Torque rods) and an ultra basic set of lures (4 bars, 4 chains, 4 machines, 2 macines with birds, 4 hoo-hoods, 4 tuna feathers, 2 large and 2 small jets - all in green, green/yellow or rainbow) plus 3 dozen live bait hooks (6/0-8/0 on 40-80lb flouro leaders and 150 lb ballbearing swivels). All of that will cost about $7k.You catch a fish yet?

fattuna
02-19-2010, 08:25 PM
Hey crdavis, that buddy that catches all of the fish on the 26 footer wouldn't happen to be Mr. Stevens would it?

crdavis61
02-20-2010, 06:05 AM
Fattuna - nope, its not Mr. Stevens.

fattuna
02-20-2010, 11:30 AM
Okay cr. Got a buddy down there on a 26 regulator that scares up a fish every time out. Great fisherman!

crdavis61
02-20-2010, 03:44 PM
That's the kind of buddy to have Fattuna!

Legal Bill
02-22-2010, 07:35 AM
I would say you can't go wrong with a set of 4 50s backed with Spectra on decent stand up rods. Shimano, Avet then Penn would be my preference. This is all you can pull from a 26' anyway and will work for troll, bait, etc. Figure 800-1000 per set up.

Yeah, 50s seem to be a good starting point. Bass Pro Shop is having their reel trade-in sale either now or next week. I think I'd get $100 off any reel priced over $500. It may be a good time to buy new, but I'll look around. I'd rather buy from a local shop, or even used stuff from an individual.

BACKTOTHESEA
02-22-2010, 09:52 AM
Yeah, 50s seem to be a good starting point. Bass Pro Shop is having their reel trade-in sale either now or next week. I think I'd get $100 off any reel priced over $500. It may be a good time to buy new, but I'll look around. I'd rather buy from a local shop, or even used stuff from an individual.

I may be mistaken, but i think BPS was also giving a $200 retail value vaccum sealer with an international purchase. $300 off+- is a pretty good deal if after a Penn and in need of a vac packer.

crdavis61
02-22-2010, 02:41 PM
hmmmm.........and I have a 250 dollar BPS gift Certificate.................

LI32
02-22-2010, 04:09 PM
You catch a fish yet?

(knock on wood) Haven't gotten skunked, even once, in the last 25 years, and I fish 40-50 days a season - may not always catch the preferred or first targeted species, but by the end of the trip something edible winds up in the fishbox. Carrying lots of gear and a variety of baits leads to more options and a better chance of catching something. Good planning and a good network of club members helps too.

Legal Bill
02-23-2010, 07:01 AM
hmmmm.........and I have a 250 dollar BPS gift Certificate.................


:grin: I only have about $85, but I'm thinking the same thing.

Sears720
02-27-2010, 10:18 AM
Hello crdavis....Just wanted to say you look like you have the bug like the rest of us. My name is Taylor Sears I will be presenting at the Mass Bay Guides seminar and I am looking forward to meeting you. I am a young dude with a passion. I own Squid Bars Company, I mate and captain for the Fortuna, Labrador, Alcazar, Al Dente II, and guide on a dozen other boats out of Scituate, etc. Guys like you that are starting and are crazy about it are the best to guide for. Love it! If you ever have any questions about tackle, bars, rods, reels, sex, w/e stop by my shop and I will help you out or just shoot the shit with you about the spring. Saddle up for June! There will be good size fish in the mix (300-350lb) like last year. Our first 3 fish were in this size range and you don't really want to be unprepared. Good luck on your search for gear, feel free the PM me anytime....

Tight lines
'
-Taylor

Legal Bill
02-27-2010, 12:14 PM
Bought a pair of new Penn 9/0s today with Tidewater rods. After a lot of research, I decided this was a good bet for getting started. I now have two trolling set-ups to go with my two jigging rods and reels, so I'm hoping that will be enough to get me started. If i really get into this, I can always buy a couple of higher end set -ups for trolling and run four lines, so i don't think the investment in the Penns will go to waste. Now I have to work on trolling lures.

crdavis61
03-02-2010, 08:17 AM
Hey Taylor - I'll be at the seminar this weekend. See you there! Chuck

Fresh Fish
03-04-2010, 01:16 PM
Once you have all the rods, reels, terminal tackle, gaffs, lures, etc., get a good quality tuna belt and a harness that also connects to the boat somewhere. You never know when the deck gets wet ...

crdavis61
03-04-2010, 03:49 PM
FF - true............ that will be a good feeling!

sharktripper
03-04-2010, 04:35 PM
You don't say how big of a boat you are getting, so what you need and even what you'd like ot have may vary. If you only have range to target school Bluefin, your budget will be a lot smaller than if you are planning to go after giants or yellowfin/big eye in the canyons. Another factor, which goes along with boat size is how versatile is your gear.
My gear is pretty much single purpose - Ive got a set of 5 Penn Internationals for sharking, another set of 11 for Offshore trolling + 6 for chunking, and 4 Penn Torques for tuna jigging (all with rods). You will also need tackle, everything from a large assortment of trolling bars, lures, hoo rigs to jigs and chunking hooks to gaffs and enough bags to store all that stuff neatly. My Offshore tackle consists of 20+ spreader bars, 100+ other lures, 30+ hoo-heads, 100+ hooks with leaders for shark, tuna, swordfish, tilefish, squid and some other general stuff. For landing equipment, 4 belt/harness combos, 2 flying gaffs, 1 harpoon with 3 darts, 4 fixed gaffs (2-5" + 2-3"), ARC dehookers, bait & landing nets. I've got about $22k in rods/reels, $2k in landing gear, and another $5k in tackle.
For Tuna, I would think to start out with maybe 7 trolling/chunking outfits outfits (3-50w's + 2-30w's + 2 16's) of good quality (Penn Internationals and all roller guide rods) and 2 jigging outfits (Penn Torque 200's and matching Torque rods) and an ultra basic set of lures (4 bars, 4 chains, 4 machines, 2 macines with birds, 4 hoo-hoods, 4 tuna feathers, 2 large and 2 small jets - all in green, green/yellow or rainbow) plus 3 dozen live bait hooks (6/0-8/0 on 40-80lb flouro leaders and 150 lb ballbearing swivels). All of that will cost about $7k.
Don't forget the most important investment of all.. $20.00 for your HMS permit, to insure that you hang on to everything else you bought.

luckytuna
03-04-2010, 05:08 PM
guys dont spend to much it sounds like it going tobe over after this year with the cities passing in the usa . the goverment don't want us fishing for anything



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