The Boating Forum - Who Builds Best Small Custom Carolina 20-25' ?

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maverickfl
03-07-2007, 10:32 AM
I am looking for a small custom carolina builder (20-25 foot range). Does anyone have any suggestions. Websites/Names/Numbers would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for your help.


jdfnav69
03-07-2007, 10:47 AM
tagging along on this one.

marlineer
03-07-2007, 10:50 AM
Calyber Boats.....Bar none


ccat
03-07-2007, 11:13 AM
A friend of mine is building a sweet custom carolina boat that will be for sale when finished. All cold molded and lots of carolina flair I think its around 25'.

iFishMD
03-07-2007, 11:26 AM
I don't have a lot of knowledge of others but I agree with marlineer that Calyber boats are probably one of most impressive boats I have ever seen. A local THT member has a 25' CC and I saw a yellow 25' Express when in Avalon NJ. The are nothing short of unbelievable

tg
03-07-2007, 01:55 PM
What sort of hull are you looking for? Plain or fancy?

ballywho27
03-07-2007, 02:40 PM
www.shearlineboatworks.com.

They build a great boat.

blockhead
03-07-2007, 04:35 PM
mav,
give jim murphy a call at http://www.calyberboatworks.com/ . i might be a little biased, but i believe they build an awesome boat. nobody stands behind their boats like these guys. if you want to check one out, mine is in lighthouse point, fl for awhile. then up to the chesapeake.

blueh20pc
03-07-2007, 04:52 PM
Foster Boats in Hatteras has a few 80's Ricky Scarborough hulls they've redone and popped a mold off of. They look impressive, haven't ridden on one tho. About 110K with a f250 Yammi.

The mold was popped off a cold molded hull, they're going to start laying them up like the BD 28's. I think they have one cold molded hull left. Selling it through Macgregor Yacht sales (look in the back of marlin Mag for the number.)

jeff
03-07-2007, 05:27 PM
Damn, that 25' Calyber is beautiful.

Bullshipper
03-07-2007, 08:36 PM
Carolina Classic 25.

2005 SeaCraft
03-08-2007, 07:06 AM
Blockhead...yours wouldn't happen to be light aqua green/blue in color, would it?

b04747
03-08-2007, 07:52 AM
Try John Lancaster of Diamond City boats in Beaufort, N.C. He does everything, but the tower himself and has a couple of guys that used to work at Jarrett Bay with him. Their attention to detail inside and out is tremendous. He just finished a 64, but has a 25 or 26 in the shop now almost ready for glass. He could probably e mail you some pictures. His number is 252 646 6680.

Eyehooker
03-08-2007, 08:08 AM
Beautiful and the " WOOD" looks awesome

ccat
03-08-2007, 09:02 AM
Bullshipper made a good reccomendation. I toured their facitlity thats a great boat for the money and custom built one at a time. Thats a beast of a 25footer

blockhead
03-08-2007, 09:23 AM
2005 seacraft,
well, that depends on what i was doing when you saw me.
however, it would probably be me. awlgrip calls the color "seafoam" green.

Cooper
03-08-2007, 11:11 AM
It doesn't have quite the flare of cold molded or fiberglass boats, but there's a DIY stitch and glue carolina style boat over at bateau.com. Many styles from 23-25' - small cabin, express, different deck/transom configurations, etc.

http://boatplans-online.com/images/boatpics/CS25_short_bow_350.jpg
http://boatplans-online.com/images/boatpics/CS25_bracket_350.jpg
http://boatplans-online.com/images/boatpics/CS23_350.jpg
http://boatplans-online.com/images/boatpics/CS23_pl.JPG
http://boatplans-online.com/images/boatpics/CS23_short_stern_350.JPG
http://boatplans-online.com/images/boatpics/CX25_stern_350.jpg

ccat
03-08-2007, 11:42 AM
Talked to a guy who built the 25 Bateau boat, he said it wasnt a good design and the flair was nothing like the photos above really dissappointed with it.

Cooper
03-08-2007, 11:53 AM
I don't think there's that much flare just because you can't do the compound curves required without putting slits in the wood. Too many slits and the bow droops. So there is some flare, more than other bateau designs, but not much. Certainly don't build it with the expectation that it's going to have crazy flare. It's more just the carolina style.

On that issue, why couldn't the deck (gunnels) be extended a few inches past the sides at the bow? That would effectively create some flare and not look bad.

ccat
03-08-2007, 11:56 AM
I guess with the stitch and glue method it limits alot of the things you can do versus a true cold molded boat.

Uncle Dick
03-08-2007, 02:14 PM
You might want to look at a glouster (sp) 20. It not carolina built, but has great lines with a tumblehome design that is very well built.

captsuperfly
03-08-2007, 02:22 PM
The new G20s have a liner in it too. Still 3 piece so you don't lose the under gunwale storage. Pretty sweet.

Those Shearline custom jobs are about the prettiest things I've seen.

billh1963
03-08-2007, 05:39 PM
Bullshipper - 3/7/2007 8:36 PM

Carolina Classic 25.

For the money I agree! I'm biased, of course!

abfish
03-08-2007, 06:30 PM
The Carolina Classic 25 is a great boat, but it's not a "custom Carolina", at least not in North Carolina.

A Carolina boat is of cold-molded construction, with exaggerated bow flare, broken shear, lots of tumblehome, relatively low transom deadrise, very clean design with no unnecessary doo-dads.

These design features do not translate to a good ride in boats as small as 25 ft. I test drove a beautiful custom last summer built near Atlantic, NC, 24 ft. long x 9 ft. beam. Prettiest small boat that I have ever been on, and a "Carolina boat' by every measure. But it was wet, and it pounded, regardless of engine trim or trim tab settings.

A 25 ft. boat is not long enough to overcome the lack of deadrise in this design, no matter how sharp the entry is or how big the flare is. The cold-molded boats are relatively light, also, further compounding the problem.

Apply the same design parameters to a 53 Jarrett Bay, and you get an incredible ride, and good efficiency, particularly when compared to a production fiberglass boat. The tradeoff in the Jarrett Bay is that some interior volume is sacrificed due to the sharp entry.

jdfnav69
03-08-2007, 07:08 PM
I strongly agree with your definition of a Carolina boat AB, but I would like to make one addition. A true Carolina custom doesn;t have those funny looking things hanging off the back of it either. You guys know what I am talking about here right? OUTBOARDS. No let the bashing and blood letting commence.

kwjoe
03-08-2007, 07:28 PM
You are right about the outboard motors.However I have to say I must have the only little custom carolina that rides good. She's juniper planked on juniper frames,glassed over,single inboard and a tower,and she rides great.Now,she is only 28' so when it gets a little snotty you have to pull 'er back a few hundred ,and I would venture to say that all of them when pulled back a tad ride just fine.Lets face it there little boats,not 60 foot Ricky boats.99% of the time it's who's running the boat and not so much the boat that makes for a good ride.

Bullshipper
03-08-2007, 07:35 PM
abfish - 3/8/2007 6:30 PM

The Carolina Classic 25 is a great boat, but it's not a "custom Carolina", at least not in North Carolina.

A Carolina boat is of cold-molded construction, with exaggerated bow flare, broken shear, lots of tumblehome, relatively low transom deadrise, very clean design with no unnecessary doo-dads.

A 25 ft. boat is not long enough to overcome the lack of deadrise in this design, no matter how sharp the entry is or how big the flare is. The cold-molded boats are relatively light, also, further compounding the problem.



What are you smoking?

The Carolina Classic has a 24 degree deadrise and is one of the few OEM's that will go to the trouble of installing heavy inboard motors almost midships, unlike everyone else that wants to just use outboards.

Add the heavy weight, deisel economy, flare, steep entry angle and the enclosure to round out the package and you have the state of the art in the industry IMO.

Plus there are a buch around so you have the option of choosing new or used.

So if you can find another 25' out there with a better ride in this configuration lets name it, instead of tearing down this one and offering what you think is better.

A cat will beat the ride, but you loose the deisels and room y cabin.

Drifter
03-08-2007, 07:51 PM
Bull- I don't think anyone would argue the merits of the CC 25, but it is not considered a "custom Carolina". It might be better (in performance and / or construction) than similarly sized custom Carolina boats, but it's still not a "custom Carolina".

Seavee-One
03-08-2007, 07:53 PM
If you want the real deal go to Harkers Island and talk to Alex Willis http://www.alexwilliscarolinacustom.com/914330.html
he will build you a sweet custom CC, built with traditional methods and harkers island flare, cypress and juniper

the design everyone else copied -> http://www.alexwilliscarolinacustom.com/969287.html is still the best

jdfnav69
03-08-2007, 07:54 PM
Show us some pics kw.

Bull, I think you misunderstood. I agree with AB that a Carolina Classic is not a true Carolina Custom by his definition. Customs are cold molded, sharp entry and flat sterned boats. Now a Carolina Classic has a sharp entry, big bow flare, but she's solid fiberglass and has a 24 degree dead rise, I love them.

I don't agree that the custom carolina design won't work in a small boat. The Calyber is an excellent riding boat, but not a speed demon. Runing hard and fast, she will beat you to death. Pull the pins back and let the bow get down and cut the water, the way she was designed to work, and she rides great.

hblac
03-08-2007, 08:00 PM
ballywho27 - 3/7/2007 2:40 PM

www.shearlineboatworks.com.

They build a great boat.

Bogue Sound Boat Company in Morehead City has a beautiful Shearline 23 for sale for $119,000. I looked at one at the Coliseum Boat Show in Raleigh a few years ago but they were way, way out of my price range then. They kinda still are out of my price range ;? but that doesn't stop you from appreciating them. Georgeous boats.

By the way I have no affiliation with either Shearline ( I'd love to be a customer one day :) ) and none with Bogue Sound other than having bought my current boat there.

Hal

blueh20pc
03-08-2007, 08:37 PM
I don't agree that the custom carolina design won't work in a small boat. The Calyber is an excellent riding boat, but not a speed demon. Runing hard and fast, she will beat you to death. Pull the pins back and let the bow get down and cut the water, the way she was designed to work, and she rides great.

That's the principle here.

Look at any Carolina designed cold molded Battlewagon from Buddy Davis, Paul Mann, Sculley, Blackwell, Briggs, Briglia, whoever.

The transom deadrise (measured at the transom) is......get ready...

15-17 degrees, the bow flair at entry is about 60, amidships is roughly 40's.

There not made to run fast, but rather cruise at 20 knots and slice gracefully through the water.

Some builders would argue you can't get a Carolina Custom ride with less than 35 feet, because the LOA and Beam don't come into play until then.

makosteve66
03-08-2007, 09:02 PM
blueh20pc - 3/8/2007 8:37 PM



There not made to run fast, but rather cruise at 20 knots and slice gracefully through the water.



Not meant as a bash or an insult, but it is not 1985 anymore. I agree with most of your post, but the above line is completely off the mark. 20 knots does not cut it anymore - period. No one spending the kind of $ for true custom carolina would go anywhere near a new one that had that kind of cruise. 28-34 knots is the norm. see this url about a Paul Mann 65 cruise is 34 knots. http://www.marlinmag.com/article.jsp?ID=41699

Some are even being built faster. They are designed to slice through the water - but at considerably more than 20 knots. That being said, I have not ridden on any of the "pocket" carolina customs and am not convinced that hull configuration works in a boat under 30 feet

blueh20pc
03-08-2007, 09:27 PM
makosteve66 - 3/8/2007 8:02 PM

blueh20pc - 3/8/2007 8:37 PM



There not made to run fast, but rather cruise at 20 knots and slice gracefully through the water.



Not meant as a bash or an insult, but it is not 1985 anymore. I agree with most of your post, but the above line is completely off the mark. 20 knots does not cut it anymore - period. No one spending the kind of $ for true custom carolina would go anywhere near a new one that had that kind of cruise. 28-34 knots is the norm. see this url about a Paul Mann 65 cruise is 34 knots. http://www.marlinmag.com/article.jsp?ID=41699

Some are even being built faster. They are designed to slice through the water - but at considerably more than 20 knots. That being said, I have not ridden on any of the "pocket" carolina customs and am not convinced that hull configuration works in a boat under 30 feet

Very True, not an insult at all.

The biggest race of the Carolina builders these days, between those I mentioned above, plus Hatteras, Whiticar, Donzi, ACY, and the other Florida boys, is, as you posted, cruise speed and more importantly on the top-of the line models, top end and fuel capacity.

When I worked at Sculley, the 64 (as seen on ESPN's BXRL, the Water Witch), the main focus of that boat was fishing time, and nothing less. When launched, top speed was 43 Knots. 43 KNOTS. I know for a fact some are pushing 50 knots now at top end. They'll blow the engines before losing a weigh in when it comes down to it, especially for a high end tournament (white marlin, big rock, etc.) The Sculley 64 (Water Witch) could cruise comfortably at 35 knots, but everybody was interested in one thing, top speed. Those Cats' burned about 180GPH at 43 knots tho.

I'm just spiff balling here, but my main point to the OP was that deadrise is not an end all and be all, most Carolina Customs are scaled down versions of the bigger boats. And if you can get the ride of the bigger boats on a 20-25 CC, then you're going to have to throttle back so the hull can absorb the water. Yes, the bigger boas are cruising at approaching 40 knots, but the smaller CC designed boats can't match that due to length.

The Dude
03-08-2007, 09:41 PM
There was another NC builder that built a lot of smaller 20-25' Carolina CCs - I used to have the link, but I can't find it now. Anyone know what I'm talking about? If I remember correctly, they weren't as outrageously priced as all of the other Carolina boats.

chromeoverbrass
03-08-2007, 09:42 PM
Everyone here is getting off the point. The man asked "Who builds the best custom Carolina boat 20 -25 feet". Speed wasn't mentioned, ride wasn't mentioned (you can't compare a 20-25 foot Juniper skiff to a 65 foot battlewagon featured in Marlin magazine) Any Carolina builder who will build you a small boat can easily achieve your speed standards. Some guys are building prettier boats than others and some ride better and are dryer than others. Isn't that the same with production boats whether they are 20 foot or 65 foot long? Every boat builder is trying to produce the best riding and best looking boat out there. Don't sell the "true" Carolina builders out, they sort of have some history behind them. You just have to find one who will build you what you want for what you want to spend.... Not many want to build something in that size class anymore but several do still exist.

abfish
03-08-2007, 10:14 PM
Bullshipper - 3/8/2007 7:35 PM

abfish - 3/8/2007 6:30 PM

The Carolina Classic 25 is a great boat, but it's not a "custom Carolina", at least not in North Carolina.

A Carolina boat is of cold-molded construction, with exaggerated bow flare, broken shear, lots of tumblehome, relatively low transom deadrise, very clean design with no unnecessary doo-dads.

A 25 ft. boat is not long enough to overcome the lack of deadrise in this design, no matter how sharp the entry is or how big the flare is. The cold-molded boats are relatively light, also, further compounding the problem.



What are you smoking?

The Carolina Classic has a 24 degree deadrise and is one of the few OEM's that will go to the trouble of installing heavy inboard motors almost midships, unlike everyone else that wants to just use outboards.

Add the heavy weight, deisel economy, flare, steep entry angle and the enclosure to round out the package and you have the state of the art in the industry IMO.

Plus there are a buch around so you have the option of choosing new or used.

So if you can find another 25' out there with a better ride in this configuration lets name it, instead of tearing down this one and offering what you think is better.

A cat will beat the ride, but you loose the deisels and room y cabin.

You definitely misunderstand me. I agree that a CC25, with a deep vee and a lot of weight is a great riding boat, great layout, very efficient, extremely well built. I have been drooling over them at boat shows for 10 years. What I'm saying is that a Carolina Classic is not considered a "Carolina boat" or "custom Carolina boat" by anyone that I know in North Carolina.

And in my experience, the "Custom Carolina" formula does not make for a good offshore boat in the 20 to 25 ft. price range.

For a great Carolina boat at a reasonable price, check out Outerbanks Boatworks on Harkers Island. Shearline and Calyber are my personal favorites, if price is no object.

If I wanted to find the best Carolina builder, I'd spend a day in the Harkers Island/Morehead City area, and another day in Wanchese.

iFishMD
03-08-2007, 10:35 PM
Here is Blockhead's 25' Calyber along side of board members Elusive's Pursuit:

http://homepage.mac.com/kevinfarrell/.Pictures/Photo%20Album%20Pictures/2006-06-17%2016.47.02%20-0700/Image-5B066D0AFE5B11DA.jpg
http://homepage.mac.com/kevinfarrell/.Pictures/Photo%20Album%20Pictures/2006-06-17%2016.47.02%20-0700/Image-5B069A64FE5B11DA.jpg
http://homepage.mac.com/kevinfarrell/.Pictures/Photo%20Album%20Pictures/2006-06-17%2016.47.02%20-0700/Image-5B06C9BEFE5B11DA.jpg

ccat
03-09-2007, 09:22 AM
Custom Carolina boats were built to bust through tough inlets thats why they had so much flair. Another design was the boats first built around Hatteras look at the Albatross Fleet these were the first charter boats ever built in NC. http://www.albatrossfleet.com/AlbatrossFleetHistory.html

2005 SeaCraft
03-09-2007, 12:17 PM
Hey Blockhead...I have two pics I think you would like. We were heading out of the LightHouse point inlet early one morning and took two pics of a boat which caught my eye...it might be yours. The first pic is beside our boat idling out...the second pic is you guys busting through a wave with the sun just coming up in the back ground. The pics are a little large in size (camera was set on a higher setting)...but it might be you... If so, I think you would like the one picture for sure.

blockhead
03-10-2007, 05:44 PM
2005 seacraft,
if there were a bunch of clueless old guys on board, that was probably us. i'd love to get copies of the pics. i've sent a PM.
thanks,
dave



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